Anterior Cruciate Ligament Knee Injury: Roller Bridges

This exercise is a great way to strengthen and give more stability to your knee which may be weak or unstable from a previous or current injury of your Anterior Cruciate Ligament (your ACL) and is great for building your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running or cutting.

Lie down on your back and place a roller underneath your lower legs between your calf and ankles to start. Activate the inner core muscles of the low back and keep them engaged throughout.

To start, curl the roller towards you butt while you bend your knees. When your heels come over the roller, bridge your butt up nice and high and hold it at the end for a good long second. Then slowly bring the butt back down moving the roller towards the feet, reversing the direction of movement with control back to the start. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets daily.

This exercise is a great way to strengthen and give more stability to your knee which may be weak or unstable from a previous or current injury of your Anterior Cruciate Ligament (your ACL) and is great for building your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running or cutting.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Low Back Strain: Running Rehab Knee Highs

Resisted knee highs strengthens the hip flexors in conjunction with your core and can help you rehab your functional running strength after a low back strain.

Loop a resistance band around your ankle. Step the opposite foot forward while having the opposite arm also forward and position yourself in a running stance with your core muscles engaged below the belly button.

Bring the knee up towards the chest matching the motion with the opposite arm and then bring the foot back down with control.

A few things to look out for when you’re doing this exercise is to control the motion of the foot so the resistance band doesn’t uncontrollably pull your foot back and also keep the arms and knees from crossing the mid line of the body and prevent the low back from flexing or extending backwards too much by keeping it in neutral.

Repeat this for one minute on each side doing 3 sets 2x/day.

Resisted knee highs strengthens the hip flexors in conjunction with your core and can help you rehab your functional running strength after a low back strain. 

Cycling Events: A Collaboration with Help4Me Cycling

 Helpforme Cycling and INSYNC Physiotherapy have collaborated to create this helpful guide to injury prevention. The following stretches and exercises are geared specifically for cyclists. 

With a big race coming up, the last thing a cyclist needs is an overuse or strain injury during training. We encourage you to begin incorporating injury prevention exercises into your training regimen.

Core Strengthening 
Plank (and variations)
● A classic exercise that helps strengthen the core muscles that base the power for all our major movements. Place forearms on the ground and lift core, start by holding for 30 seconds and increase as your training goes on. This exercise, along with the climbers below, can be made more difficult by placing arms on a yoga ball, adding a side plank, or passing a medicine ball between your hands during the plank. 

Mountain Climbers
● This exercise is ideal to perform between training sets at the gym, or to finish off a workout. Starting in a push up position, alternate legs bringing them to a mid-thigh height and then back to start. Once again, start with 30-second intervals and increase as training continues. 

Inner Core Focused Knee Drops
● This exercise focuses on the inner abdominal muscles. Start by laying on your back on a mat. Lift your legs with bent knees, alternate slowly dropping your feet until they touch the ground, bring back to start. Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

Lower Body
Clamshells
● Begin by laying on your side on a mat. Keep your knees bent at a 45 degree angle and legs on top of each other. Make sure your hips are aligned and your core is engaged. Raise the top knee up resembling a clamshell opening until you feel a stretch. Do 30 reps on each side repeating 3-4 times. 

Lower Leg Heel Drop
● This exercise and the one below aid in strengthening the supporting muscles of the lower leg while helping with flexibility in the joints. Place the balls of your feet on a raised surface such as an aerobic step or even stairs, drop the heels down as far as you can without feeling unstable, raise and repeat.

Calf Raises
 ● This is a classic way to strengthen the calf muscles that does not require any extra equipment. Start with your feet flat on the floor and aligned with your shoulders. Raise heels up off the ground and slowly lower, raise again before they touch the ground. Repeat 10-20 times before lowering heels back to starting position.

Hamstring Stretch
 ● This stretch focuses on flexibility in the hamstring muscle and maintaining mobility in the supporting muscles. Starting by laying on your back next to a door frame or a cornered wall. Place the heel of one leg on the edge, with your other leg straight on the ground. Keep your back flat and your core engaged. Now with the toes off, you’re going to slide the heel up on the corner of the wall or door frame, keeping the other knee straight as well, with the core engaged hold for 30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg. Do three sets. 

Created with Collaboration with Help 4 Me Cycling

If you have any pain during exercises, or are unsure about what you are doing, please consult your local physiotherapist before continuing.

Tammy Brimner, Clint Trahan & Jen Letham. Image 8. Let’s Get Visceral: Video and Photography. RBC Gran Fondo Whistler 2019
https://www.rbcgranfondo.com/whistler/media/

Tourism Whistler. Gorgeous weather for riders on the ride from Vancouver to Whistler.
Whistler Tourism Events 2018
https://www.whistler.com/events/granfondo/

Knee Ligament Injuries – One Leg Looped Band Bridges

Wrap a looped resistance band around your thighs just above your knees. Engage the core muscles below the belly button by pulling them inwards while you keep breathing.

Ensure your knees are aligned with your ankles and your hips while you take up the slack in the looped band. Push through your heels with the feet flat on the ground and bridge the butt up keeping both sides of the pelvis level with each other.

Then straighten out one leg, hold it here for 10 seconds, and then bend your knee and lower your butt back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets daily.

This exercise progression helps to further strengthen and rehab the knee when you have a sprained ligament that is causing weakness and a decrease in use and function.

Knee Ligament Injuries: Looped Band Bridges

This exercise helps to strengthen and rehab the knee when you have a sprained ligament that is causing weakness and a decrease in use and function.

Wrap a looped resistance band around your thighs just above your knees. Engage the core muscles below the belly button by pulling them inwards while you keep breathing. Ensure your knees are aligned with your ankles and your hips while you take up the slack in the looped band.

Push through your heels with the feet flat on the ground and bridge the butt up keeping both sides of the pelvis level with each other. Hold this for 10 seconds, and then lower your butt back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets daily.

This exercise helps to strengthen and rehab the knee when you have a sprained ligament that is causing weakness and a decrease in use and function.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Summer Activities: Kayaking

Kayaking can be an excellent form of exercise that’s also fun to do during the summer. As a seemingly low impact activity, it can actually improve your aerobic fitness, strength, flexibility, as well as balance. Along with this, studies have shown that kayaking also leads to stress reduction, as well as an improvement in mental health.

But like any other activity, there are precautions and it is always smart to warm up before exercising.

Take a look at a few of our paddling warm up stretching videos below!

If you have any pain during exercises, or are unsure about what you are doing, please consult your local physiotherapist before continuing.

ACL Knee Ligament Injury: 1-Leg Deadlifts

One-leg deadlifts are a great way to strengthen your entire leg and give more stability to your affected knee.

Maintain neutral posture and engage your core muscles below the belly button. Plant your entire left foot on the ground.

When you bend forward at your hips press your foot and knee straight back and reach your arms down to the floor. Remember to keep both hips level and don’t lock out or hyper extend the left knee. Repeat this for 10 repetitions for 3 sets to start on the affected side.

One-leg deadlifts are a great way to strengthen your entire leg and give more stability to your affected knee which may be weak or unstable from a previous or current ACL ligament injury and is great for building your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running or cutting. It can also help prevent ACL ligament injuries as well.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Sacro Iliac Joint strain: One-Legged Superman Deadlifts

Start off with nice tall posture and engage your core muscles below the belly button. Plant your entire right foot on the ground while keeping both knees straight.

When you bend forward at your hips press your opposite leg and knee straight back and reach your arms straight out in front of you. Keep both hips level and knees straight but don’t lock out or hyper extend that right knee.

Repeat this for 10 repetitions for 3 sets to start on each side.

One-legged superman deadlifts are a great way to strengthen your sacro iliac joint and core stability muscles and help build your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running, cutting & hiking.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

What is Flat Foot?

When you look at a foot, there is typically a gap underneath the inner part of the foot when you stand. This is your arch. This arch provides the spring in your step, and allows body weight to be more efficiently distributed across your feet and legs. The structure of the arch can also determine a person’s gait. People with flat foot will have something known as a fallen arch, where they have either no arch in their feet or an arch that is very low to the ground. A common cause of flat feet includes genetics, as this is a trait that can be passed on from parents through genes. Having weak arches, or a foot/ankle injury can also lead to a flat foot. Flat foot can also come with age, as well as many other factors.

If you’re looking at your feet right now and discover that your arch is low or absent, you don’t need to worry. Flat foot only needs treatment if it causes discomfort, or leads to pain in another part of the body. Many people seem to have a low arch or no arch without ever experiencing any pain. 

Exercises to manage symptoms of flat feet include:
Heel Stretches

  • Keep one leg forward and the other behind you
  • Press both heels firmly into the floor, while keeping your spine straight
  • Bend into the front leg and push yourself against a wall with your arm to feel a stretch in the back leg and Achilles tendon.
  • Hold this position for 30 seconds and repeat on each side. 

Golf Ball Roll

  • Sit on a chair with a tennis or golf ball under your foot
  • Sit straight while you roll the ball under your foot, focusing on the arch
  • Repeat for 1-2 minutes.

Towel Curls

  • Sit in a chair with a towel under your feet
  • Push your heels into the floor and curl your toes to scrunch up the towel
  • Hold this for a few seconds and release. 

Other methods to treat flat feet include orthotic devices, motion control shoes, or going to physical therapy to correct flat feet, in the case that it is a result of injury or poor form.

If you have any pain during exercises, or are unsure about what you are doing, please consult your local physiotherapist before continuing.

Ankle Instability: One-Legged Deadlifts Progression

This One-legged deadlift progression can add more strength in your entire leg and give more stability to your ankle which may be weak or unstable from a previous or current injury.

Start by holding a 5 pound weight in your hands. With nice tall posture engage your core muscles below the belly button. Plant your entire left foot on the ground with both knees straight.

When you bend forward at your hips press your opposite leg and knee straight back and reach your arms down to the floor with the 5 pound weight. Remember to keep both hips level and don’t lock out or hyper extend the left knee.

Repeat this for 5 to 10 repetitions for 3 sets to start on each side.

This One-legged deadlift progression can add more strength in your entire leg and give more stability to your ankle which may be weak or unstable from a previous or current injury. It’s great for building your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running, cutting, or hiking and even rock climbing.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

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