Category Archives for "Neck Pain"

Neck Strain Injuries – Thoracic Mobility Lunge Reach Up Rotates

Each vertebrae in your back work together to support the overall functional movement throughout your entire spine. Having improved functional mobility in your thoracic spine, or your upper back is important for the full recovery of your neck.

Start by lunging forward with your right foot and twist your body to the right while reaching straight up above your head with your left arm and hand. Keep your low back in neutral position and your inner core muscles below the belly button pulled in and engaged.

When you lunge forward make sure your knee stays over your ankle and aligned with your second toe, hip and shoulder and that the low back doesn’t arch. Avoid having your knee fall into the mid line of your body or going past the front of your toes. Push back up to the start with the forward foot while unwinding the back and bringing the arm back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets for each side.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have uncertainty about where you’re at with your neck strain or injury, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Ball Core Stability Strength Progression 5

​Here’s another great way to strengthen the core stability muscles for your neck. Roll out on your stomach onto a big ball with only your hands and feet touching the floor. Avoid your chin tilting out or extending your neck backwards. Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other.

Make sure the slack in the elastic band is taken up. Maintaining constant tension in the band and angle the left hand downwards to the left side of the floor. Then slowly raise the right hand with resistance, bringing the arm out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring it back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition. Complete 5 repetitions, doing 3 sets, two times daily on each side.

This exercise continues to strengthen the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in conjunction with your upper and lower quadrant core strength.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Neck Strain Injuries – Ball Core Stability Strength Progression 4

Here’s yet, another great way to progress the core strength for your neck to help with the recovery in your functional activities and sport.

Begin by rolling out on your stomach onto a big ball with your hands and feet touching the floor only. Avoid tilting your chin out or extending your neck backwards. Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other.

Make sure the slack in the elastic band is taken up. Then slowly abduct the arms out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition. Complete 5 repetitions, doing 3 sets, two times daily.

This exercise progressively strengthens the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in correspondence with your upper and lower quadrant core strength. If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Ball Core Stability Strength Progression 3

Here’s another great way to progress the core strength for your neck to help with the recovery in your functional activities and sport.

Begin by rolling out on your stomach onto a big ball with your hands and feet touching the floor only. Avoid tilting your chin out or extending your neck backwards. Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other. Then slowly abduct the arms out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition. Complete 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets, two times daily.

This exercise progressively strengthens the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in correspondence with your upper and lower quadrant core strength. I

f you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Core stability Strength Progression 2

Progressing the core strength for your neck is important for the recovery in your functional activities and sport.

Begin by standing tall in neutral spine posture. Avoid tilting your chin up or extending your neck backwards. Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other. Make sure the slack in the elastic band is taken up.

Then slowly lift your right arm diagonally upwards and lower your left arm downwards diagonally at the cadence of 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition.

Complete 5 repetitions at this angle and then alternate the angle so that the right hand is pulling down for 5 reps as well for a total of 10 repetitions. Do 3 sets of this two times daily.

This exercise progressively strengthens the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck with angled arm movements in a functional standing position. If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Core Stability Strength Progression 1

Progressing the core strength for your neck is important for the recovery in your functional activities and sport.

Begin by standing tall in neutral spine posture. Avoid tilting your chin up or extending your neck backwards. Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other. Make sure the slack in the elastic band is taken up.

Then slowly abduct the arms out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets, two times daily.

This exercise progressively strengthens the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in a functional standing position. If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Core Stability Strength

Doing some basic core strengthening is important for a better recovery of your neck strain injury. Begin by standing tall in neutral spine posture. Avoid tilting your chin up or extending your neck backwards.

Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise your hands with both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other. Then slowly abduct the arms out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition. Repeat this for 15 repetitions doing 3 sets, two times daily.

This exercise begins to rehab your neck strain injury by strengthening the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in a functional standing position.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Pain Injuries – Lev Scapula Muscle Stretch on Wall

To gently stretch out the right Levator Scapula muscle start by standing close to a wall. Tilt and rotate your head to the left while looking at a spot downwards to the left side of the wall without further aggravating your symptoms.

Then, slide the pinkie side of he hands up the wall towards the ceiling until you feel a stretch barrier on the right side of your neck. Hold that for 30 seconds and repeat it for 3 sets on both sides.

This is a gentle way to increase mobility in your neck if you’ve experienced an acute strain or whiplash injury. You want to avoid any increases in sharp or bad pain, but a mild stretching sensation is ok when performing this. Best research evidence - based practice indicates that early mobility and movement is good for the recovery of your neck injury after an acute strain or whiplash.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Pain Injuries – Lev Scapula Muscle Stretch

To stretch out the left Levator Scapula muscle, bring your right hand back and behind your head with the pads of your fingertips on the first two vertebrae of the neck. Bring the left hand behind sliding it down your back keeping your elbow pointing up.

Begin to look with your eyes to a spot down on the right side of the floor. With your right hand, gently pull the left side of the neck and head away from your left shoulder until you feel a stretch barrier on the left side. Hold that for 30 seconds and repeat it for 3 sets on both sides.

This is a great way to improve mobility in your neck if you are experiencing chronic stiffness, tightness or pain from prolonged sitting, sports or have old whiplash injuries that are haunting you.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Neck Strain Injuries – Standing Neck Rehab Level 2

Begin by standing with your back against a wall and in tall neutral spine posture. Then roll up a towel and place it behind your head against the wall for support in neutral. Avoid tilting your chin up or extending your neck backwards.

Press the tip of your tongue up against the roof of your mouth and raise both arms straight up and shoulder width apart with your thumbs pointing towards each other. Take up the slack in the elastic band. Then slowly abduct the arms out for 5 seconds and then slowly bring them back again to the start position, again taking 5 seconds to complete the movement for your first repetition.

 Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets, two times daily.

This exercise begins to rehab your neck strain injury by further strengthening the deep neck stabilizing muscles of your neck in a functional standing position.

If you’re unsure about the exercise or have any uncertainty about where you’re at with the recovery of your neck, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

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