Category Archives for "workout"

Full Body TRX Work Out

Cull Body TRX Workout

The TRX System relies on suspension training equipment that allows individuals of varying fitness levels and abilities to perform a wide range of exercises. Body weight exercises, also known as total resistance exercises, on the TRX can help strengthen different muscle groups in many planes of motion in a safe and effective way. Try the following exercises below for a full body workout!

1) TRX Inverted Row:

Face toward the anchor of the TRX and grasp the handles with palms facing each other and arms fully extended. Position your feet slightly apart and in front of your body to begin in a leaned position. Ensure your body forms a straight line from head to toe, engage the core muscles, and pull your body towards the handles by keeping the elbows close to the torso. Then, slowly lower yourself back down to the starting position. Repeat for 3-4 sets of 10. Lower the handles or position your feet further in front for more lean to increase the difficulty.

Face away from the anchor of the TRX and grasp the handles with an overhand grip and full extend both arms. Position the feet slightly apart behind your body and lean forward so the body is at a slight diagonal. Lower your body towards the handles by bending the elbows. Then, push yourself up by contracting your chest and tricep muscles to the starting position. Repeat for 3-4 sets of 10.

Face away from the anchor of the TRX, place the top of your foot onto both TRX handles to form a 90 degree bend in the knee and stand tall on the other leg. Bring your body straight down to the ground to perform a lunge. Do not let the knee of the standing leg go past your foot when performing the lunge. Make sure the knee is in line with the foot at all times. Repeat for 3-4 sets of 10.

Face away from the anchor of the TRX, place the top of your foot onto both TRX handles to form a 90 degree bend in the knee and stand tall on the other leg. Bring your body straight down to the ground to perform a lunge. Do not let the knee of the standing leg go past your foot when performing the lunge. Make sure the knee is in line with the foot at all times. Repeat for 3-4 sets of 10.

Begin with your back flat on the ground and both heels on the TRX handles with your hands on either side of your body. Engage the core and lift your hips upward by activating your glute muscles. Ensure your ribs are not flaring by pulling them downward toward your belly button. Then, slowly lower yourself down to the starting position. Repeat for 3-4 sets for 10 reps.

5 Morning Stretches to Wake Your Body Up

Ever feel sore from a workout that you did the previous day or from sleeping in an odd position all night? Try out these quick and simple stretches in bed when you wake up in the morning!

1) Full Body Stretch: 

Lie on your back with your legs together. Extend both of your arms overhead. Lengthen your spine by stretching your arms as far overhead and your legs stretched as far downwards as you can. Hold for 30 seconds or more.

2) Spinal Twist: 

Lie on your back with your right leg extended straight down. Bend the left leg at the knee and cross your knee to the other side of your body. Open your left arm to the side and turn your head to the left side. Hold for 30 seconds or more, then repeat on the other side.

3) Hamstring Stretch:

Lie on your back with one leg extended straight down. Hold the back of your thigh or your knee and bring the other leg extended upwards towards your chest. Bring the leg close to your chest until you feel a comfortable stretch through your hamstrings. Hold for 30 seconds or more, then repeat on the other side.

4) Child’s Pose:

Begin with your knees and feet together. Then sit back on your heels and extend both arms overhead placing your palms onto your bed. Take a deep breath in and press your belly against your thighs. Hold for 30 seconds or more. Variation: Walk your fingers over to the top right corner of your bed as far as you can reach to stretch the left side of your body. Then repeat on the other side.

5) Bedside Hip Lift: 

Begin by the side of your bed with both feet planted on the floor and your palms placed shoulder-width apart near the middle of the bed behind your body. Press your heels into the floor and your hands into the bed to lift your hips upwards towards the ceiling to form a straight line between the top of your head and to your knees. Hold for a couple of seconds, then slowly bring your hips back down to the starting position. Repeat 5 or 6 times.

Images retrieved from:
http://www.yogabasics.com/asana/child/
https://www.thoughtco.com/funny-good-morning-quotes-2831856
http://rajora.in/fitness/exercise-sequence/static-streching/
http://www.satyaliveyoga.com.au/2015/02/26/sleepasana/
http://sunina.com/2014/03/
https://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/advice/

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Whole-Body Partner Workout

Looking to try something new for your next workout? Try these fun and challenging exercises with a partner at the gym or at home. 

1) Medicine Ball Pass: 

Lie on your back with a mat with your feet planted next to each others. Begin with one person holding the medicine ball, then both sit up by engaging the core, and pass the ball to the other person. Repeat back-and-forth passes by performing simultaneous sit-ups for 20 to 30 repetitions. 
                                                                                                                                  credit: Kami Price

2) Squat Seesaw:

Grab a resistance band with a handle on each end and stand face to face. Begin with one person performing a squat to bring the resistance band downwards, while the other person stands tall and brings the resistance band overhead by extending their arms. Remember to keep an upright body position through out the movement and engage the core. Repeat for 20 repetitions. 
                                                                                                                              credit: Travis McCoy

3) Push-up to Bent-over Row:

Partner #1 will begin in a push-up position by placing both hands on the floor shoulder-width apart while the partner #2 holds the ankles. Partner #1 will perform a push-up by engaging the core and glutes to lower their body towards the floor as Partner #2 holds their ankles by keeping their arms extended and back neutral. After Partner #1 has brought their body back up by pushing up, Partner #2 will then pull their partner’s ankles upwards to chest level to perform a row. Repeat 10 times before switching roles. 

                                                                                             credit: Kami Price

4) Single-Leg Core Rotation:

Stand tall side to side with your partner and hold a medicine ball. Raising the outer leg to a 90 degree angle for each person, engage the core, and rotate to pass the ball back and forth between your partner and yourself. Complete 10-15 passes before switching positions to raise the other leg and complete another set. 
                                                                                                                              credit: Travis McCoy

5) Plank High-Fives

Begin in a plank position facing each other by placing hands directly below your shoulders and body positioned in a straight line. Engage the core and keep the spine neutral, raise one hand while the other partner raises the opposite hand to high-five in the space between you and your partner. 

                                                                                                                            credit: Stephanie Smith
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Safely Exercise When Pregnant

Remaining active during a pregnancy may help reduce some discomforts and help prepare the body for delivery. Acute exercise generally increases oxygen uptake, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and lung volume during pregnancy. Remember to complete the “PARmed-X for Pregnancy” health screening prior to participation in a prenatal fitness class or other exercise. Medical clearance should be obtained prior to exercise for women who were sedentary prior to pregnancy or have a medical condition.

Benefits:

  • reduced backaches
  • reduced constipation and bloating
  • may help prevent gestational diabetes
  • improved weight management
  • increase in energy
  • improved mood
  • improved posture
  • better sleep patterns
  • development of muscle tone
  • promotes strength and endurance
  • better coping with labour

Contraindications to Exercise:

Absolute Contraindications:

  • hemodynamically significant heart disease
  • restrictive lung disease
  • incompetent cervix/cerciage
  • multiple gestation at risk for premature labour
  • persistent second or third trimester bleeding
  • placenta prevue after 26th week of gestation
  • premature labour during current pregnancy
  • ruptured membranes
  • preeclampsia/pregnancy-induced hypertension

Relative Contraindications:

  • severe anemia
  • unevaluated maternal cardiac dysrhythmia
  • chronic bronchitis
  • poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • extreme morbid obesity
  • extreme underweight
  • history of extremely sedentary lifestyle
  • intrauterine growth restriction in current pregnancy
  • poorly controlled hypertension
  • orthopaedic limitations
  • poorly controlled seizure disorder
  • poorly controlled hyperthyroidism
  • heavy smoker

Warning Signs to Terminate Exercise Session

  • vaginal bleeding
  • dyspnea before exertion
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • chest pain
  • muscle weakness
  • calf pain or swelling
  • preterm labour
  • decreased fetal movement
  • amniotic fluid leakage

Exercise Recommendations:

Aerobic Exercise

Frequency: 3-4 days per week (women who exercise less than 2 days or greater than 5 days may increase their risk of having a low-birth-weight baby) 
Intensity: Moderate intensity exercise is encouraged for women with a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 kg per squared meter. However, women with a pre-pregnancy BMI of greater than 25 kg per squared meter should engage in light intensity exercise.
Time: More than 15 minutes per day is recommended. Individuals may gradually increase the duration to a maximum of 30 minutes per day of moderate intensity exercise for a total of 120 minutes per week. A 10-15 minute warm-up before exercise and 10-15 minute cool-down of light physical activity after a training session is recommended. 
Type of Exercise: Use large muscle groups in dynamic, rhythmic physical activities.

Resistance Exercise

One to three sets of 10-15 reps with approximately 2-3 minutes rest in between each set is recommended. Engage in light to moderate resistance exercises. The following are sample routines according to different trimesters from Brad Schoenfeld (NSCA). 

References:
http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancy-health/exercise-during-pregnancy/
https://www.nsca.com/uploadedfiles/nsca/resources/pdf/certification/quizzes/quiz_pack_articles/october_2011_33.5.pdf
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Exercising in the Heat

As the temperature beings to rise, athletes must be aware of the effects of exercising in the heat on the body and on performance. Heat loss during exercise can occur through four different processes: evaporation, radiation, conduction, and convection. As the body’s core temperature rises, blood is transported to the periphery for cooling. This leads to a deficit in the body’s central fluid, which results in a smaller stroke volume (volume of blood pumped from the heart) and an increased heart rate for a given exercise intensity. Splanchnic vasoconstriction, a reduction in blood flow to the internal organs, especially to the abdomen, attempts to compensate for the peripheral outflow. However, this may lead to gastrointestinal and kidney issues.

Heat Stroke:

There are various heat illnesses that an athlete may be susceptible to. Exertional heat stroke (EHS) occurs at a body temperature of greater than 104°F (40°C) immediately post collapse and central nervous dysfunction. Symptoms include: headache, confusion, dehydration/muscle cramps, gastrointestinal upset, profuse sweating, rapid pulse, low blood pressure, and quick breathing. To treat EHS, immediately remove equipment and excess clothing. Cool the athlete as quickly as possible within 30 minutes via whole body ice water immersion. However, if this method is unavailable, move to a cool area and rotate cold wet towels. Check for airway, breathing, circulation and continue to monitor vital signs until paramedics arrive. Cease cooling when body temperature reaches approximately 101-102°F (38.2-38.9°C).

DID YOU KNOW?

That heat-related fatalities occurring during sports have more than DOUBLED since 1975. (Source: Korey Stringer Institute)

Heat Exhaustion:

Heat exhaustion is another heat illness commonly experienced by athletes and occurs due to cardiovascular insufficiency and energy depletion that may or may not be associated with physical collapse. Individuals with a body mass index of greater than 27 or exercising at temperatures greater than 33°C are at a higher risk of experiencing heat exhaustion. Symptoms include: fatigue, nausea, weakness, hyperventilation, core body temperature between 96.8-104°F (36-40°C), and heavy sweating. Treatmentbegins with moving the athlete to a cool area and removing equipment or excess clothing. It is important to elevate the legs to promote venous return. Attempt to cool the individual with ice water or fans and rehydrate.

Heat Cramps:

Heat cramps are painful involuntary cramping that often occurs in the legs, arms, or abdomen. Athletes may experience these abnormal muscle contractions if they are prone to excessive sweating, not acclimated to the heat, have heavy clothing or equipment, exercising for prolonged periods without proper hydration, or experiencing muscular fatigue. Similar to the previously mentioned heat illnesses, treatment is to move the athlete to a shaded area, rehydrate with cold water, and stretch or massage the cramped muscle in its fully stretched position. Provide foods that are high in salt content to replenish lost electrolytes from sweating.

General Prevention: 

The best predictor of recovery is early recognition and rapid treatment. Enforce a gradual progression of exercise and acclimation to the heat. Educate athletes on how to recognize heat illnesses and be aware of when to cease activity. Hydrate and rest appropriately throughout training.
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Strength Training for Dragon Boat Paddlers

Dragon boating season is beginning in the lower Mainland as teams get out and train on the water for upcoming races. However, one of the key components integral to a team’s success in competition is building individual strength.  A typical dragon boat stroke consists of a “catch” phase which targets the shoulders and arms and a “pull” phase which relies on strong back muscles. The following exercises can be included in your workout routine to develop a powerful dragon boat stroke.

CATCH Phase: Arm Muscles

Strong shoulders, biceps, and triceps are needed to enter the water effectively while grabbing as much water as possible. Develop strength in these areas with dumbbell overhead presses, dumbbell shrugs, bicep curls, and bench presses.
Image: T-Nation
To Do a Proper Bench Press:

1) Set up by positioning your eyes directly under the bar and lie flat on the bench
2) Adduct your scapula and raise your chest
3) Grasp the bar with an equal distance from your left hand to the center of the bar and from your right hand to the center of the bar (use the rings on the bar as a guide)
4) With a big breath, brace your core, and unrack the bar by straightening the arms
5) Lower the bar to the middle of your chest by bringing the elbows in at an approximately 75 degree angle
6) Once the bar touches your chest, push the bar upwards until the elbows lock and the arms are straight
7) Breathe and repeat the bench press

PULL Phase: Back Muscles 

The latissimus dorsi is a large, triangular-shaped muscle located on the back that is crucial for a paddler to pull as much water as possible. Strengthen this muscle with overhead pull downs, seated rows, bent over rows, and pull-ups.
Image: Isaac Insoll
To Do a Proper Pull-Up:

1) Hang from a pull-up bar and grasp the bar about shoulder-width apart with palms facing away from your face
2) Retract and adduct the scapula
3) Pull yourself up while bringing your elbows down to the floor until your chin passes the bar
4) Lower yourself all the way down, breathe, and repeat the pull-up

Variation: Add weights to your pull-ups using a dumbbell between your feet, a belt and chain with added weight plates, or a weighted vest. Start by adding a very small weight such as 5 lbs and attempt to do 2 or 3 reps for 5 sets. Increase your weight load during the following week by adding another 5 lbs and attempt to do 2 or 3 reps for 5 sets. Continue adding to your load as your strength improves.
Check out this video for some GREAT paddling stretches after an intense water workout:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2gwmXBsdag
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.