Category Archives for "tendon"

Which is Better for an Injury: Ice or Heat?

Ever wondered whether to use ice or heat for your sore muscles, your healing fracture, or any injury? Both ice and heat have been commonly used to treat an array of injuries, but when to use either one is critical in preventing further damage and promoting faster recovery.

Acute irritation or inflammation of a muscle, ligament, or tendon is typically treated with ice. The cold application reduces inflammation and numbs the pain, especially when the superficial tissues are red, hot, and swollen. The inflammatory response associated with damage to tissues is a defence mechanism in the human body that lasts for the first several days to protect against infection. The response involves immediate changes to blood flow, increased permeability of blood vessels, and flow of white blood cells to the affected site.

ICE APPLICATION

Ice can be used for gout flare-ups, headaches, sprains, and strains. It is crucial to apply ice to the site of injury during the first 48 hours post-injury to minimize swelling. For soft tissue injuries such as muscle strains or ligament sprains, an ice massage involving elevation of the injured body part above the heart and circular movement of an ice pack around the affected area may promote faster recovery of these acute injuries. Apply for 10 minutes at a time, then take a break from icing for another 10 minutes. Repeat this process 3 to 5 times a day. Remember to wrap the ice pack in a dry cloth or towel.

HEAT APPLICATION

Heat can also be used for headaches, sprains, and strains as well as arthritis or tendinosis. Heat causes blood vessels to dilate which increases blood flow and relaxes tight or stiff muscles and joints. Do not use heat during the initial inflammatory response as this will further aggravate the site of injury. For minor injuries, applying heat for 15 to 20 minutes at a time may be sufficient to relieve tension. However, longer periods of heat application such as 30 minutes to an hour may be required for major chronic injuries. Hot baths, steamed towels, or moist heating packs can be used as different heat options.

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How to Recover from Achilles Tendinopathy

The Achilles tendon is the thickest tendon in the human body. It attaches the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (together known as the triceps surae) as well as the plantaris muscle to the calcaneus bone (heel) of the ankle. These muscles combined allow for plantar flexion at the ankle and flexion of the knee.

Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon refers to a condition that causes pain, swelling, or stiffness at the tendon connecting the muscles to the bone. Commonly found in athletes such as runners, overuse of the tendon, may result in microtrauma or repeated injuries to the Achilles tendon. Wearing improper footwear, having poor training or exercising techniques, making a sudden change to your training program, or exercising on hard surfaces may also cause minor injuries to this tendon. Pain and stiffness may develop gradually and are typically worse in the morning. Pain is generally worse after exercise, but may potentially arise during training. Overtime, symptoms may be so severe that individuals may be unable to carry out their usual daily activities.

Recovery:

Rehabilitation occurs quickly or over several months depending on the severity of the injury. Although pain may be present, expert clinicians and researchers recommend continuing daily activities within one’s pain tolerance. As complete rest should be avoided as much as possible.

In the early stages of Achilles tendinopathy, a treatment called iontophoresis may be used to reduce soreness and improve function. This treatment involves delivering a medicine (dexamethasone) to the painful area. Ice packs are also effective in reducing swelling. Apply ice pack wrapped in a towel or dry cloth to the affected area for 10 to 30 minutes at a time.

However, researchers have found that Achilles tendinopathy is often successfully treated with strength training guided by a physical therapist. Strength training relies on using one’s body weight with or without additional weight for resistance to load the tendon and associated muscles to strengthen the calf. Do exercises slowly to decrease pain, improve mobility, and return to normal functioning.

Try these exercises below:

1) Heel-raise: Stand with your feet a few inches apart. Raise up on to your tiptoes and lift the heels by using both legs. Then lower yourself down using the affected leg. Perform 3 sets of 15 repetitions twice per day. This exercise can also be performed seated in a chair.

2) Calf stretch: Stand a few steps away from a wall and place your hands at about eye level. Place the leg you want to stretch about a step behind the other leg and bend the knee of the front leg until you feel a stretch in the back leg. Remember to keep your heels planted. Hold this position for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 to 4 times before switching to the other leg. Repeat twice per day.

3) Towel stretch: Sit with both knees straight on the ground and loop a towel around the affected foot. Gently pull on the towel until a comfortable stretch is felt in the calf. Hold position for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 to 4 times before switching to the other leg. Repeat two to three times per day.

Check out these videos:

Strengthen the Calf Muscles with 1-Legged Squats:
Roll Out Stiff Calves:

Reference: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(5):427. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.0506
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Do I Actually Have Tendinitis?

The term “tendinitis” is frequently used by injured individuals, family practitioners, and medical specialists. Commonly present in the Achilles, lateral elbow, and rotator cuff tendons, many still believe that there is a large inflammatory component in overuse tendinitis and anti-inflammatory medication can be used to treat this condition.

According to Assistant Professor Khan of the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (2002), “ten of 11 readily available sports medicine texts specifically recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treating painful conditions like Achilles and patellar tendinitis despite the lack of a biological rationale or clinical evidence for this approach.”

Patients who present with a painful overuse tendon condition more likely have a non-inflammatory pathology. Studies have revealed that the cause of tendon pain arises from collagen separation. Collagen is the main structural protein found in connective tissues. When these tendon fibrils become thin, frayed, and fragile, they begin to separate and become disrupted in cross section. This leads to an increase in tendon repair cells rather than inflammatory cells.

There is limited evidence of short term pain relief and no clear evidence of effectiveness when relying on anti-inflammatory medications. A more appropriate term would be to use “tendinopathy” to acknowledge that the overuse condition is not in fact tendinitis. Correctly utilizing this term provides patients with a more accurate description of their condition, prevent ineffective pharmacotherapy, avoid medical costs, and allow time for collagen to repair. Tendon disorders realistically take months rather than weeks to resolve. Allow time for rest and slowly incorporate exercises for area of concern. See a physiotherapist for proper diagnosis and treatment options.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1122566/

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