Tag Archives for " Sacro-iliac joint "

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Wall

This simple exercise works the gluteus medius muscle of your hip if it’s really weak! Start by leaning your forearm into the wall and have your outside hip flared out. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest . Start by squeezing the outside hip in and drive across to the other hip and upwards. Bring the outside hip in line with the knee and foot below. Then release and drop your hip back out and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This is a close-chain exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle and helps to prevent your hip from flaring out and stabilizes your sacro iliac joint when do weight bearing activities like running , any running sports or even walking and hiking.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Ball

This is an advanced ball exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle in your hips. It helps to stabilize your sacroiliac joint when walking, hiking, running , and any running sports that involve cutting like soccer, football or ultimate frisbee. Wrap a resistance band around your inside hip.Lean your inside hip onto the exercise ball against the wall and pull with the band towards the outside hip with your hand. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest. Start by driving your outside hip into the ball to bring the inside hip upwards so it’s level with your other hip. Then release and drop your inside hip back down and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This exercise should not produce any pain. If it does please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Wall Squat Core Activation

This exercise can help with Sacro Iliac joint pain that can be caused by hyper mobility or instability due to strained ligaments from repetitive strain or acute trauma. If you experience pain or you’re unsure about this exercise please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. Wrap a closed loop resistance band around the thighs just above the knees. Then position yourself so that your low back is fully leaning up against the big ball on the wall. Keep your posture nice and tall but don’t arch your low back when leaning upright against the big ball. Next, engage you inner core stabilizers by contracting your pelvic floor muscles and pulling your transverse abdominal muscles below your belly button inwards, hugging your spine. Remember to keep breathing. Leaning your weight on the ball slide downwards doing a wall squat while you maintain static isometric pressure against the resistance bands. Keep your knees over your ankles and in alignment with your second toes. Hold the wall squat for 10 seconds. Repeat this for ten repetitions doing three sets daily.

Hip, Low Back, Sacro-Iliac Joint Pain or Stiffness: Hip Flexor Stretch

Kneel down onto your left knee. Then rotate it about 45 degrees past the midline of your body. To keep your posture nice and tall imagine there’s a string pulling your whole spine upwards from your pelvis, right up your entire back and neck and up to the top of your head. Then engage your inner core muscles tight below your belly button and keep your low back flat. Next, bend the right knee forward and keep your posture nice and tall without leaning backwards. Then reach your left arm up pointing the fingers towards the ceiling nice and high and point your right finger tips to the floor. Hold this stretch for 30 seconds and repeat 3 times for each side. This stretch can help with hip, low back or sacroiliac joint pain and dysfunction. If you experience pain and continue having problems then consult your Physiotherapist. 

Back, Sacro-Iliac-Joint Pain & Dysfunction: Core Stability Strengthen (With Progression)

Lying with your low back flat on the foam roller pull your inner abdominal muscles downward. Imagine you are making yourself skinnier at your waistline and breath into your diaphragm. Slowly lift one bent knee up towards the chest, followed by the other knee while keeping your core engaged, low back flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Then slowly lower one leg down at a time. Repeat this for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily on the foam roller to strengthen your core stability muscles for your lower back, pelvis / sacroiliac joints and hips. To progress and increase the difficulty of this exercise, start with both knees and both arms straight up in the air while lying flat on the foam roller. Reach one arm up above your head towards the ground and lower your opposite leg with a bent knee back down to the floor while keeping your core engaged, back nice and flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Return the arm and knee back to the start position and do this for the other arm and leg. Repeat this alternating pattern with the arm and opposite leg for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily. If you are experiencing any acute or sharp pain consult your Physiotherapist before doing either of these exercises.

Back, Sacro-Iliac-Joint Pain & Dysfunction: Core Stability Foam Roller

Lying with your low back flat on the foam roller pull your inner abdominal muscles downward. Imagine you are making yourself skinnier at your waistline and breath into your diaphragm. Slowly lift one bent knee up towards the chest, followed by the other knee while keeping your core engaged, low back flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Then slowly lower one leg down at a time. Repeat this for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily on the foam roller to strengthen your core stability muscles for your lower back, pelvis / sacroiliac joints and hips. To progress and increase the difficulty of this exercise, start with both knees and both arms straight up in the air while lying flat on the foam roller. Reach one arm up above your head towards the ground and lower your opposite leg with a bent knee back down to the floor while keeping your core engaged, back nice and flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Return the arm and knee back to the start position and do this for the other arm and leg. Repeat this alternating pattern with the arm and opposite leg for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily. If you are experiencing any acute or sharp pain consult your Physiotherapist before doing either of these exercises.

Hip Extension Retraining

This exercise is great for hip extension retraining. Start by pulling in your inner core below the belly button while keeping your posture in neutral. Be careful to avoid arching the low back. Keeping your inner core engaged extend the hip with the knee bent at 90 degrees. Hold this at the end range for a few seconds and then bring it back down. Repeat this 10 times 3 sets 3 times per day. This exercise is excellent to help retrain the motor activation of hip extension in your hip due to hip joint, Sacro-iliac joint, low back and knee injuries.