Tag Archives for " rotator cuff "

Shoulder Rotator Cuff Strain: Resisted Clock Reaches

If you’ve been doing the “Clock Reaches” exercise and it has been getting super easy without resistance then this progression will help further strengthening the rotator cuff and the shoulder after an injury.

With a light resistance band loop wrapped around your wrists, kneel down in 4 point position with your fists on the ground and keep your spine in neutral posture with your inner core muscles engaged. Imagine there is clock face numbered 9 to 3 O’clock on the ground in front of you.

Begin by reaching the right hand to 9 O’clock and then back to the start position. Proceed to continue to 1O, 11, 12, 1, 2 and then 3 O’clock, and then reverse back to 9 O’clock again. Repeat this for your left hand. Perform 3 sets of 5 for each side.

This exercise is also great to do if you want to increase strength even when you’re not injured. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Shoulder Rotator Cuff Strain: Clock Reaches

This is a great exercise for strengthening the rotator cuff and the shoulder complex muscles after straining the rotator cuff.

Kneel with your fists on the ground and keep your spine in neutral posture with your inner core muscles engaged. Imagine there is clock face numbered 9 to 3 O’clock on the ground in front of you.

Begin by reaching the right hand to 9 O’clock and then back to the start position. Proceed to continue to 1O, 11, 12, 1, and then 2 and then 3 O’clock. and then reverse back to 9 O’clock again. Repeat this for your left hand. Perform 3 sets of 5 for each side.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Shoulder Rotator Cuff Strain Injuries: In / Out Rotation With Resisted Movement

If you have injured your shoulder rotator cuff but can still move it then this might be the right exercise for you.

With a light exercise band tied at shoulder level proceed to take up the slack. Then placing a folded towel between your side and elbow and place your opposite hand onto your shoulder lightly to prevent it from hiking upwards.

With the thumb up, slowly rotate the lower arm and wrist in towards your body making the upper arm and elbow the pivoting point and then bring the arm back to the start position with control. Prevent the elbow from pinching in towards your side or doing a chicken wing coming out. Do 3 sets of 10 repetitions for each side.

Doing the unaffected side will also help with the neuromuscular rehab of the rotator cuff muscles. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Shoulder Impingement Pain: Rotator Cuff Muscle Stretch

To stretch out the right rotator cuff muscle, place a non-stretchy strap with your left hand over your head and behind your back. Reach the right hand behind your back to grab the strap. Reach as far up as you can towards your limit but avoid tilting your shoulder forward. Stabilize the front of your right shoulder by placing it against a corner or a door frame and step the left foot forward. Hold tightly with your right hand and pull the strap upwards with your left. Hold this stretch for 30 seconds and repeat for 3 sets. Doing this stretch daily can help increase the mobility of your stiff shoulder if you’re experiencing shoulder impingement pain due to a tight overuse Supraspinatus Rotator Cuff muscle. It’s also great to do as a warm down stretch when it’s abnormally tight and stiff. If you have pain or if you’re unsure about how to do the exercise, please consult with your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Rotator Cuff Strain

This exercise is great for rehabbing from a rotator cuff strain or shoulder impingement strain. Wrap a mild resistive elastic band half way down the mid back, and then cross it over at the front and securely wrap both ends onto each hand. Turn facing a wall and place your pinky finger and edge of hand firmly against it. Keep your posture tall and inner core engaged while pushing your hands against the wall up to the ceiling in “V” formation and externally rotate the hands out, holding it at the top for a good long second. Then slowly bring it back down. Repeat this 10 to 15 repetitions for 3 sets. By keeping your inner core engaged and your posture tight, this exercise is great for rebuilding the shoulder strength you need in any overhead reaching sports, especially rock climbing, volleyball, and basket ball. You should not have any pain when doing this exercise. If you do experience pain please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Shoulder Impingement Pain: Rotator Cuff Eccentric Strengthening

Shoulder Impingement pain can be caused by muscle imbalances in the Shoulder Complex. Weak and shortened external rotator cuff muscles can be one of the contributing factors to this problem. When the Rotator cuff is strong and activates properly, it dynamically stabilizes the shoulder joint and allows for proper biomechanics to occur. To strengthen the external rotator cuff muscles position your elbow by your side, shoulders relaxed and your posture in spine neutral. Holding on to a resistance band use your other hand to help it out to the end range of external rotation. The opposite hand is doing all the work pushing the band outward that is being held by your other hand. Then let the hand holding the band slowly return to the start position. This is called Eccentric Strengthening because you’re strengthening the rotator cuff with a lengthening movement of the muscles. Repeat this for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets daily.

7 Easy Exercises with a Towel

Home exercising can be just as effective as going to the gym by using household items such as a medium-sized towel. Check out the exercises below for a full body work-out:

1) Plank Walks: 

In a plank position with a towel under both feet and maintaining a neutral spine, walk forwards by placing one hand in front of the other for 10 to 20 steps.

2) Neck Rotation: 

Find where the hairline ends to locate a noticeable “bump” on the back of your neck. This is the spinous process for your 2nd cervical vertebrae. Place the edge of an unrolled towel on this spot, then cross your hands over, making sure the top hand is on the same side as the direction of rotation (e.g. right arm will pull towel downwards towards the middle of the chest if you are turning LEFT). Complete a pain-free rotation 3 times in each direction per day.

3) Knee Tucks: 

Start in a plank position with a towel under both feet and keep a neutral spine, then engage the lower abs below the belly button to pull the knees in toward the chest. Extend the legs back to starting position and repeat for 10 reps. 

4) Reverse Lunge: 

Place one foot in front and a towel underneath the other foot that is slightly behind. Slide the rear foot backwards until the knee of the front leg is at a 90 degree angle. Press the rear leg back into standing position by engaging the glutes and hamstrings. Repeat 10 times on each leg. 

5) Rotator Cuff Holds: 

Step into a door with the left foot and throw a towel over to the back of the neck with the left hand and reach with the right arm to grab the other end of the towel. Prop the right shoulder on the edge of a doorway and hold this position for 20-30 seconds while maintaining a neutral spine. 

6) Single-Leg Hamstring Curls: 

Get into a bridge position by lying flat on your back, hands to the either side of your body and knees bent. Place a towel under one foot, then slide this leg forward while keeping the other leg in the bent position. Slide the extended leg back into starting position. Remember to engage the core and glutes. Repeat 10 times on each side.

7) Back Extensions: 

Lie flat on your stomach and place a towel under each hand, then extend both arms forward so that your chest and chin are near the floor. With the core engaged, slide both hands towards your body and lift your upper body off the floor. Repeat 10 times. 
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Reduce Interscapular Pain

Persistent pain between the shoulder pains, or interscapular pain, may arise from a number of varying causes. The scapula is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone) on either side of the body. The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus, all of which make up the rotator cuff. The major muscles surrounding the scapula that make up the interscapular region include the rhomboids, trapezius, and levator scapulae.

The rhomboids are two quadrate-shaped muscles that originate from the lower cervical vertebrae and upper thoracic vertebrae and attach to the medial border of the scapula. The rhomboids work to retract and rotate the scapula downwards. The trapezius muscle extend from the occipital bone of the skull to the lower thoracic vertebrae and attach to the scapular spine. Its action is to elevate and rotate the scapula upwards. Likewise, the levator scapulae run from the upper cervical vertebrae to the superior portion of the medial border of the scapula and works to elevate the shoulder blades.

CAUSES

One of the common causes of interscapular pain may be due to a muscle strain of one of the muscles described above from poor posture, lifting, or twisting motions from activities such as golf or tennis. Other causes may include trauma such as dislocations or rotator cuff tears, cervical or thoracic herniation, arthritis, heart conditions, cancer, gallbladder disease, scoliosis, or gastroesophageal acid reflux.

TREATMENT

Treatment begins by identifying possible underlying causes contributing to the pain between the shoulder blades. Poor posture occurs when the head is forward and shoulders are rounded. This stretches the rhomboid muscles excessively and causes the muscle to weaken. Correcting poor posture by taking frequent breaks from sitting, bringing your shoulders down and away from the ears, as well as evenly distributing your body weight to all sides may help relieve upper back soreness.
Active release, moist heat therapy, and intramuscular stimulation with a physiotherapist are effective ways to release tension in the back muscles.
Consult a physician or specialist to assess for gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and cardiac-related conditions as they may cause referred pain in the upper back region.
Watch the following videos below on how to stretch and strengthen key muscles in the shoulder region:

Rotator Cuff / Shoulder Impingement Rehabilitation:

Advanced Strengthening for Weak Shoulder:

Scapular Muscle Strengthening / Activation:

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.