Category Archives for "stability"

What is Cuboid Syndrome?

Ever feel pain or swelling on the side of your foot? These symptoms may be due to a condition called Cuboid Syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation or lateral plantar neuritis. In addition to pain in the lateral mid-foot, redness and a restricted range of motion in the ankle may be present. This syndrome is typically associated with an inversion sprain of the ankle. This is when the foot is forced inwards causing the cuboid bone to sublux, or partially dislocate. The cuboid bone is located near the mid-point of the outer side of the foot and is one of the seven tarsal bones that make up the arch of the foot. It connects the foot and ankle as well as provides stability to the foot.

The peroneus longus muscle is a muscle that runs along the outer side of the lower leg and attaches to the lateral side of the foot. Repetitive strain of this muscle due to activities such as ballet, jumping, or running, may place tension on the cuboid bone. Commonly found in athletes, Cuboid Syndrome may also occur in sports such basketball, football, or soccer. Weight-bearing, uneven pavement, or quick changes in direction that occur in sports may aggravate symptoms. A third cause of this syndrome may be an individual’s altered foot biomechanics. Athletes who have over-pronated feet, also known as flat feet, may be more prone to cuboid subluxation.

Imaging such as x-rays, MRIs, and CT scans can be used to rule out other causes of pain. However, a cuboid subluxation can be difficult to diagnose and therefore, must be carefully assessed by a general physician or other health care professional.

STRENGTHENING

Daily strengthening and mobility exercises should be performed on a pain-free basis to prevent the foot and ankle from becoming weak or stiff. Watch the videos below on how to properly perform strengthening exercises:

Use a resistance band tied to a stable anchor and wrap it around the unaffected leg. With the affected ankle, stand either in front of the band or inside while keeping your posture tall and inner core engaged. Hike the foot with the band wrapped around the leg up off of the ground and slowly push the leg out to the side and then slowly return it back to the middle while keeping the foot off of the ground the entire time. Resist the movement with the standing leg by squeezing the butt muscles. Repeat this 10 times for 3 sets daily.
Start by putting your weight on the side of the affected ankle and hike the opposite foot up off of the ground. Remember to keep your inner core tight below the belly button. Then with the foot that’s off of the ground touch the first point in front of the ground, then to the side and then behind you, and then cross over to the other side of the body. Repeat the 4 points of contact (front, left side, back and right side) for 30 seconds 4 sets 4 times per day. As you get stronger increase it to 60 seconds 4 sets 4 times per day. If you have a fracture as a result of your injury or you are unsure if this is the right exercise for you to do, consult your physiotherapist before starting this exercise.
Starting with tall posture, engage your core muscles below the belly button by drawing the lower abs inwards toward the spine. Avoid arching the low back. With arms in a ready position do a one-legged squat with your body weight distributed equally over the foot. Don’t go any lower than a ninety degree bend in the knees, keeping your knees in alignment with your second toe and over your heel as much as possible. Hold for a good long second and then straighten back up with your butt muscles to the start. Do three sets of ten repetitions daily. 

TREATMENT

Other treatment options include foot support such as padding, taping, or orthotics to help stabilize the bones of the midfoot or correct for over-pronation. Rest from repetitive, weight-bearing actions such as jumping or running may help alleviate pain. Ice affected area for 10 minutes at a time to reduce swelling and inflammation. Consult your family physician, physical therapist, or podiatrist to perform a manipulation if the cuboid bone is suspected to be dislocated.


InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Building a Stronger Core to Prevent Low Back Pain

Up to 80% of individuals will experience some lower back pain at least once in their lifetime. Lower back pain (LBP) results in high costs and places a burden on society. These costs include diagnostic, treatment, and indirect costs associated with work disability. A number of conditions can lead to low back pain such as infections, tumours, fractures or dislocations of the spine. However, lifting heavy loads is generally thought to be a key predictor of LBP. An important element in prevention of LBP is to correctly stabilize the trunk during lifting by pre-activating the abdominal wall muscles. By doing so, the spine will increase in stiffness to reduce the effect of undesired spinal perturbations. Exercises aimed at bracing the abdominal muscles may reduce the risk of LBP.

There are two ways of stabilizing the abdominal muscles: an abdominal hollow or abdominal brace. An abdominal hollow begins by drawing in the lower abdomen (transversus abdominus) while maintaining relaxation of the other surrounding abdominal muscles such as the obliques. At the same time, small muscles of the lower back (close to the spine) such as the multifidus are contracted while the larger back muscles are relaxed. With contraction of the lower abdomen and small back muscles, intra-abdominal pressure is increased and the fascia surrounding the spine increases in tension. Combined, these contribute to provide intersegmental stability.

An abdominal brace is performed by activating all of the abdominal and lower back muscles, rather than specific muscle recruitment. By tensing the entire trunk without drawing the muscles in or pushing them out, global activation of the ab and back muscles may provide increased stability in all directions in various movement patterns.

Both the abdominal hollow and brace can help increase the stiffness of the spine to minimize lower back pain. The use of either one will depend on the desired movement pattern and the goals of the individuals in stabilizing their core. Strengthening the core muscles is also essential in reducing the amount of loading on the lower back muscles. Watch these videos below:

Back Pain, Lower Back Treatment “Building Core Strength”:

Back, Sacro-Iliac-Joint Pain & Dysfunction: Core Stability Foam Roller:

Strengthening Hips, Pelvis and Low Back For Ultimate Frisbee: “Psoas March”:

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

3 Key Exercises to Improve Balance

Why is it important to include balance training in your regular exercise program?


Balance is needed for just about everything you do on a daily basis from carrying groceries to putting on your shoes. Balance training involves strengthening exercises that target your entire body, especially the core. This not only reduces the risk of injury, but may improve motor coordination (Oliveira et al., 2017). At least 3 days of balance training per week is recommended for inactive and active older adults (> 65 yr). Activities such as pilates, yoga, tai chi, dance, or brisk walking are suitable for improving one’s balance. Implements such as bosu balls, balance boards, or foam pads can be used to add variety to your exercises. 

Try the Following Exercises Below:

1) Step-ups

a.     Stand in front of a box with a tall posture
b.     Step up with one leg, then bring the other leg up so that both feet are on the box
c.      Step down one leg at a time and repeat 10 times for each leg
d.     Increase the difficulty by using a taller box or increase your step up pace

2)  One Legged Squat

a.     Stand with a tall posture
b.     Bend your right knee and lift your right foot off the floor
c.      Keep your chest upright and arms extended to the front, slowly lower your body to the floor by pushing your hips back and down
d.     Slowly push up to the starting position and switch feet
e.     Remember to keep your knee in line with your second toe as you squat
f.      Repeat 10 times on each leg
3)  Single Leg Dead Lift

a.     Stand on your right foot, enagage the core, and slowly bend forward at the hips
b.     Reach towards the floor with the left hand and lift the left leg straight behind you
c.       Hold for 1-2 seconds and squeeze your butt muscles as your return to the starting position
d.     Switch sides and repeat 10 times on each leg
e.     Optionally: hold a light dumbbell in one hand as you reach toward the floor

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InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.