Category Archives for "Sacro Iliac Joint, Hip Pain"

Anterior Hip Pain: Advanced Hip Muscle Strengthening

A weak hip flexor can cause the joint to be impinged and move out of its dynamic stability in everyday activities such as walking, running or playing sports. Begin this advanced hip flexor exercise by engaging your lower abs and doing a poster pelvic tilt with your pelvis. Grab the front of the bench or table with your hands and keep your feet firmly planted on the floor. Slowly lower your torso backwards while maintaining the posterior pelvic tilt to as for back as possible without falling backwards or losing the posterior pelvic tilt. Then slowly return back to the start position again. Repeat this 5 times on the affected hip for 3 sets. You can even have a partner assist you by holding down your thighs and legs to help stabilize the lower extremities. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Wall

This simple exercise works the gluteus medius muscle of your hip if it’s really weak! Start by leaning your forearm into the wall and have your outside hip flared out. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest . Start by squeezing the outside hip in and drive across to the other hip and upwards. Bring the outside hip in line with the knee and foot below. Then release and drop your hip back out and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This is a close-chain exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle and helps to prevent your hip from flaring out and stabilizes your sacro iliac joint when do weight bearing activities like running , any running sports or even walking and hiking.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Gluteus Medius vs Ball

This is an advanced ball exercise for the Gluteus Medius Muscle in your hips. It helps to stabilize your sacroiliac joint when walking, hiking, running , and any running sports that involve cutting like soccer, football or ultimate frisbee. Wrap a resistance band around your inside hip.Lean your inside hip onto the exercise ball against the wall and pull with the band towards the outside hip with your hand. With your inner core engaged and your posture tall flex your inside knee up to your chest. Start by driving your outside hip into the ball to bring the inside hip upwards so it’s level with your other hip. Then release and drop your inside hip back down and repeat. Do 10 repetitions for 3 sets. This exercise should not produce any pain. If it does please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Sacro Iliac Joint Pain: Wall Squat Core Activation

This exercise can help with Sacro Iliac joint pain that can be caused by hyper mobility or instability due to strained ligaments from repetitive strain or acute trauma. If you experience pain or you’re unsure about this exercise please consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. Wrap a closed loop resistance band around the thighs just above the knees. Then position yourself so that your low back is fully leaning up against the big ball on the wall. Keep your posture nice and tall but don’t arch your low back when leaning upright against the big ball. Next, engage you inner core stabilizers by contracting your pelvic floor muscles and pulling your transverse abdominal muscles below your belly button inwards, hugging your spine. Remember to keep breathing. Leaning your weight on the ball slide downwards doing a wall squat while you maintain static isometric pressure against the resistance bands. Keep your knees over your ankles and in alignment with your second toes. Hold the wall squat for 10 seconds. Repeat this for ten repetitions doing three sets daily.

Back, Sacro-Iliac-Joint Pain & Dysfunction: Core Stability Strengthen (With Progression)

Lying with your low back flat on the foam roller pull your inner abdominal muscles downward. Imagine you are making yourself skinnier at your waistline and breath into your diaphragm. Slowly lift one bent knee up towards the chest, followed by the other knee while keeping your core engaged, low back flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Then slowly lower one leg down at a time. Repeat this for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily on the foam roller to strengthen your core stability muscles for your lower back, pelvis / sacroiliac joints and hips. To progress and increase the difficulty of this exercise, start with both knees and both arms straight up in the air while lying flat on the foam roller. Reach one arm up above your head towards the ground and lower your opposite leg with a bent knee back down to the floor while keeping your core engaged, back nice and flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Return the arm and knee back to the start position and do this for the other arm and leg. Repeat this alternating pattern with the arm and opposite leg for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily. If you are experiencing any acute or sharp pain consult your Physiotherapist before doing either of these exercises.

Back, Sacro-Iliac-Joint Pain & Dysfunction: Core Stability Foam Roller

Lying with your low back flat on the foam roller pull your inner abdominal muscles downward. Imagine you are making yourself skinnier at your waistline and breath into your diaphragm. Slowly lift one bent knee up towards the chest, followed by the other knee while keeping your core engaged, low back flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Then slowly lower one leg down at a time. Repeat this for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily on the foam roller to strengthen your core stability muscles for your lower back, pelvis / sacroiliac joints and hips. To progress and increase the difficulty of this exercise, start with both knees and both arms straight up in the air while lying flat on the foam roller. Reach one arm up above your head towards the ground and lower your opposite leg with a bent knee back down to the floor while keeping your core engaged, back nice and flat and breathing into your diaphragm. Return the arm and knee back to the start position and do this for the other arm and leg. Repeat this alternating pattern with the arm and opposite leg for 3 to 5 minutes 4 times daily. If you are experiencing any acute or sharp pain consult your Physiotherapist before doing either of these exercises.

Hip Flexor Stretch

This is a stretch for your hip flexors. You’re going to start with the weight on the right knee and stay nice and tall with your posture, pretend there is a string pulling you up through your whole spine and rotate the back leg about 45 degrees. Then you will engage your core by pulling everything below the belly button in towards your spine making yourself skinny at the waistline, then as you lunge forward with the left leg with he weight on the right knee, you’re going to reach that right arm up all the way up towards the ceiling. As you are reaching up with the right arm you’re going to reach down with the left hand, opening up that whole right side. You’re going to hold this pose and stretch keeping that core engaged for 30 seconds and do three sets. Repeat it on both sides.

Strong Hips, Strong Thighs – Buns of Steel!

Hi my name is Patrizio. I’m a Physiotherapist at INSYNC PHYSIO. Today I want to show you an exercise I call “ The Glute Routine” which is great for warm ups for runners as well as general hip and knee rehab because it targets the glute med muscle; that butt muscle here as well as the quads and makes them work together in a nice single leg movement. So the first movement I want you to do is getting on a step here and it’s called a “Lateral Step Down”. You’re just going to step down here ten times. And the trick is to keep your hands on your pelvis so you can watch what your pelvis is doing as you’re doing it because I don’t want you to drop it like that. I just want you to keep it nice and flat and neutral. So do ten of these. And the next one is a hip out to the side motion where you keep this forefoot in line with the heel on the standing leg and you’re just going to move the hip back and out like that. So ten of those! Then, after done doing ten of those we’re going to get into a little knee bend; Hold that and do ten out to the side as well like that, still keeping your hands on your pelvis. And the last one is a “Runner’s Step-up” where you’re just going to tap down and actually step up like that still going in that direction; So ten of these. Taking no breaks between each movement. And that’s the exercise!

Move Those Hips!

Hi My name is Iyad. I’m a Physiotherapist at INSYNC PHYSIOTHERAPY. Uh… today I’m going to show an exercise that’s aimed to improved hip mobility. Some people that may really benefit from this are people having a problem getting into a deep squat because of some tension into the hip and they want to be able to bend a lot easier. ahh… Some people who shouldn’t be doing this are people who have had hip surgery or hip replacement - So you should consult with your professional before you try something like this. So to do this you’re going to need a belt, a very simple belt, any belt will suffice… there’s nothing fancy to it. And you’re going to get lying on your back… So have a towel right over your hip and you’re going to put the strap closer over the groin as possible. You're going to bend the knee to your chest while the other foot pushes the belt down to give you some of that force going downwards. So you’re going to apply a gentle force as you progressively move your knee closer to your chest. You hold this for about ten seconds… once it’s sat there for about ten seconds you’ll notice it moves a bit easier and you’ll be able to take it a bit further. So usually I do this for about 5 repetitions at 10 seconds at a time, twice a day, or as instructed by your professional.

Mobilize Those Hips!

Hi My name is Iyad. I’m a Physiotherapist with INSYNC PHYSIOTHERAPY. Uh… today I’m showing an exercise that’s uh going to help mobilize the hip. People who benefit from this will be people who get a pinch whenever they kind of elevate their hip up there or they have a kind of a really stiff uh rotation angle in their hip. Uh.. people who shouldn’t be doing this are anybody who’s had surgery recently, especially a total hip replacement. You should consult with your therapist before you do something like this. Uh… to start we’re going to have a… one these pull-up assist bands right up as high up into the hip as we can… padded with a towel so it feels a bit more comfortable. You want the angle of pull to be just behind you and pulling you straight out so it can purely distract the hip in this direction. So once you’re here you get on to a stable table top position… make sure your wrist are in line with your shoulders and that your hips are in-line with your knee like Lisa has here. To start, you want to engage your core so that the pelvis doesn’t move around. We don’t want to mobilize the back of the pelvis. We want to get the hip moving. So then when we’re nice and stable through here we’ll grab this foot here and slowly rotate it out. You should stop as soon as you feel a barrier, Hold it for a couple of seconds and then come back in. And we’re going to oscillate back … hold it for two seconds and come back. We’ll do that about ten times and that should help you improve some of that restriction in there… And you want to obviously always follow it up with some of the more recommended exercises that load up the strength system in that hip because mobility alone won’t do you that good. So one more time… like I said; Nice and stable through here and just a slow twist there until she engages the barrier, then comes back in. Come out and hold for a couple of seconds and come back in.