Category Archives for "Sacro Iliac Joint, Hip Pain"

Sacro Iliac Joint strain: One-Legged Superman Deadlifts

Start off with nice tall posture and engage your core muscles below the belly button. Plant your entire right foot on the ground while keeping both knees straight.

When you bend forward at your hips press your opposite leg and knee straight back and reach your arms straight out in front of you. Keep both hips level and knees straight but don’t lock out or hyper extend that right knee.

Repeat this for 10 repetitions for 3 sets to start on each side.

One-legged superman deadlifts are a great way to strengthen your sacro iliac joint and core stability muscles and help build your strength and balance in any sports involving jumping, running, cutting & hiking.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Hip Flexor Strain Running Rehab – Knee Highs

Loop a resistance band around your ankle on the same side as the hip you are targeting. Step the opposite foot forward while having the opposite arm also forward and position yourself in a running stance with your core muscles engaged below the belly button.

Bring the knee up towards the chest matching the motion with the opposite arm and then bring the foot back down with control.

A few things to look out for when you’re doing this exercise to is control the motion of the foot so the resistance band doesn’t just pull your foot back and also keep the arms and knees from crossing the mid line of the body and prevent the low back from arching by keeping it in neutral. Repeat this for one minute on each side doing 3 sets 2x/day.

This exercise strengthens the hip flexor throughout the full range of motion and can help you rehab your functional running strength after a hip flexor injury.

Sacro-Iliac Joint Injuries: One-Leg Looped Band Bridges

This is a progression of the Looped Band Bridges.

Begin by wrapping a looped resistance band around your thighs just above your knees. Engage the core muscles below the belly button by pulling the waistline inwards to make yourself skinnier. Make sure you are still breathing, so don’t hold your breath.

Ensure the knees are aligned with your ankles and your hips while you take up the slack in the looped band. Push through your heels with the feet flat on the ground and bridge the butt up keeping both sides of the pelvis level with each other.

Then straighten out one - leg, hold it here for 10 seconds, and then bend your knee and lower your butt back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets.

This exercise activates the posterior core muscles and progressively strengthens the functional core to help with your dysfunctional Sacro-Iliac joint. If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Sacro-Iliac Joint Injuries: Looped Band Bridges

This exercise helps to activate the posterior core muscles to help you with the functional core strength for a dysfunctional Sacro-Iliac joint.

Wrap a looped resistance band around your thighs just above your knees. Engage the core muscles below the belly button by pulling them inwards while you keep breathing… so don’t hold your breath.

Ensure the knees are aligned with your ankles and your hips while you take up the slack in the looped band. Push through your heels with the feet flat on the ground and bridge the butt up keeping both sides of the pelvis level with each other.

Hold this for 10 seconds, and then lower your butt back down. Repeat this for 10 repetitions doing 3 sets.

This exercise helps to activate the posterior core muscles to help you with the functional core strength for a dysfunctional Sacro-Iliac joint.

Gluteus Medius Strengthening for Sacro Iliac Joint Injuries: Drop Steps Progression Leg Weight

This is a progression to the basic drop step exercise for your gluteus medius muscle.

With a 5 pound ankle weight strapped around your ankle side step onto the stepper with your left foot, with your hands on your hips. The opposite foot is dropped below the step to start.

Hike that right foot up and level with your left foot that’s on the stepper by pushing through the left heel and squeezing the left gluteus medius muscle.

This contraction will cause your right hip to come up level with the left side and allow you to feel that good muscle burn in your left butt. Let the right foot drop back down and the right hip to follow to return to the start position.

Perform 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets daily. This is a great way to activate and further strengthen your pelvic and sacro iliac joint stabilizing muscles after you have injured it.

If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Gluteus Medius Strengthening for Sacro Iliac Joint Injuries: Drop Steps

With nice tall neutral spine posture, engage your core stability muscles below your belly button and keep them engaged the entire time.

Then side step onto the stepper with your left foot, with your hands on your hips. The opposite foot is dropped below the step to start.

Hike that right foot up and level with your left foot that’s on the stepper by pushing through the left heel and squeezing the left gluteus medius muscle. This contraction will cause your right hip to come up level with the left side and allow you to feel that good muscle burn in your left butt.

Let the right foot drop back down and the right hip to follow to return to the start position. Perform 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets daily.

This is a great way to activate and strengthen your pelvic and sacro iliac joint stabilizing muscles after you have injured it. If you experience any pain or have any problems doing this exercise then consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Low Back Pain & Running: Wall Plank Resisted Knee Highs

Do your running injuries present as lower back pain? It’s possible that your hip mobility is restricted and that your core and hip flexor muscles are weak but you just don’t know it. This exercise may help.

Wrap a closed loop resistance band around your feet. Start by doing a posterior pelvic tilt to flatten your lower back and keep the inner core muscles engaged below your belly button to stabilize this posture and move into a plank position on the wall. Then, bring one knee in a straight line up towards your chest and then lower it back down.

Repeat this on the other side while alternating each knee to chest doing a total of 10 repetitions for each side. Perform a total of 3 sets of 10 repetitions for each side.

To Progress this exercise, simply perform the exact same technique faster while you maintain control and stability when lifting and lower the knee back down.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Anterior Hip Pain and Weakness: Hip Flexor Strength Straight Knee With Resistance

Place a closed loop light resistance band around your feet. Maintain a flat lower back with your knees straight and legs on the ground.

Engage your inner core muscles below your belly button. Start by slowly raising one bent knee up to your chest and then return it to the start position by straightening out the knee and leg back down to the ground.

Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg remains still. Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is a great progression to the Hip Flexor straight knee to address hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Anterior Hip Pain and Weakness: Hip Flexor Strength Straight Knee

Maintain a flat lower back with your knees straight and legs on the ground. Engage your inner core muscles below your belly button. Start by slowly raising one bent knee up to your chest and then return it to the start position by straightening out the knee and leg back down to the ground. Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg remains still.

Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is a great progression to the Hip Flexor bent knee to address hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Hip Pain and Weakness – Hip Flexor Bent Knee

Maintain a flat lower back with your feet in the air and your knees toward your chest while you keep your inner core muscles engaged below your belly button. Start by slowly lowering one bent knee down to allow the foot to reach the ground, and then return it to the start position above ninety degrees.

Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg do not move. Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is great if you have hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

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