Category Archives for "Sacro Iliac Joint, Hip Pain"

Low Back Pain & Running: Wall Plank Resisted Knee Highs

Do your running injuries present as lower back pain? It’s possible that your hip mobility is restricted and that your core and hip flexor muscles are weak but you just don’t know it. This exercise may help.

Wrap a closed loop resistance band around your feet. Start by doing a posterior pelvic tilt to flatten your lower back and keep the inner core muscles engaged below your belly button to stabilize this posture and move into a plank position on the wall. Then, bring one knee in a straight line up towards your chest and then lower it back down.

Repeat this on the other side while alternating each knee to chest doing a total of 10 repetitions for each side. Perform a total of 3 sets of 10 repetitions for each side.

To Progress this exercise, simply perform the exact same technique faster while you maintain control and stability when lifting and lower the knee back down.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Anterior Hip Pain and Weakness: Hip Flexor Strength Straight Knee With Resistance

Place a closed loop light resistance band around your feet. Maintain a flat lower back with your knees straight and legs on the ground.

Engage your inner core muscles below your belly button. Start by slowly raising one bent knee up to your chest and then return it to the start position by straightening out the knee and leg back down to the ground.

Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg remains still. Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is a great progression to the Hip Flexor straight knee to address hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Anterior Hip Pain and Weakness: Hip Flexor Strength Straight Knee

Maintain a flat lower back with your knees straight and legs on the ground. Engage your inner core muscles below your belly button. Start by slowly raising one bent knee up to your chest and then return it to the start position by straightening out the knee and leg back down to the ground. Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg remains still.

Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is a great progression to the Hip Flexor bent knee to address hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Hip Pain and Weakness – Hip Flexor Bent Knee

Maintain a flat lower back with your feet in the air and your knees toward your chest while you keep your inner core muscles engaged below your belly button. Start by slowly lowering one bent knee down to allow the foot to reach the ground, and then return it to the start position above ninety degrees.

Ensure that your lower back remains flat and the opposite knee and leg do not move. Repeat this movement for 10 repetitions, doing 3 sets on both sides.

This exercise is great if you have hip impingement pain with muscle imbalances and weakness coming from your hip flexors. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Anterior Hip Pain & Weakness: Wall Plank Resisted Knee Highs

Place a closed loop light resistance band around your feet. Slightly flatten the lower back and keep the inner core muscles engaged below your belly button to stabilize your posture.

Going into a plank position on the wall, bring one knee in a straight line up towards your chest and then slowly lower it back down with control.

Repeat this on the other side while alternating each knee to chest doing a total of 10 repetitions for each side. Perform a total of 3 sets, 10 repetitions for each side.

A progression of this exercise is to perform the knee lift twice as fast but still lowering the leg and foot back down with control while you keep your core muscles engaged and maintain core stability control throughout all repetitions and sets.

If you’re having anterior hip pain or weakness with your everyday functioning, then this exercise may help. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Hip Pain & Weakness: Wall Push up Knee Highs

Slightly flatten the lower back and keep the inner core muscles engaged below your belly button to stabilize your posture. Going into a plank position on the wall, bring yourself down into a push up while you lift one knee up in a straight line up towards your chest and then lower your leg back down as you straighten up with the push up.

Repeat this on the other side while alternating each knee to chest doing a total of 10 repetitions on each side to start. Perform a total of 3 sets of 10 repetitions for each side.

If you’re a runner or do sports that involve running & experience anterior hip pain or weakness, then this exercise may help.

If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Anterior Hip Pain & Weakness: Wall Plank Knee Highs

Slightly flatten the lower back and keep the inner core muscles engaged below your belly button to stabilize your posture.

Going into a plank position on the wall, bring one knee in a straight line up towards your chest and then lower it back down. Repeat this on the other side while alternating each knee to chest doing a total of 10 repetitions for each side. Perform a total of 3 sets of 10 repetitions for each side.

If you’re a runner or do sports that involve running & experience anterior hip pain or weakness, then this exercise may help. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Anterior Hip Pain: Femoral Nerve Glides Sidelye

If you have a dull ache, tingling, loss of sensation in the front of your hip area or weakness into your knee, this exercise may help. 

Lie on your side with the affected hip on top. Have your low back in some extension at the start in the rest position. 

Then, flatten the lower back by reversing the extension and flex the knee by bringing the heel closer to the butt and extend the hip back while you extend the neck backwards. Then release with performing this continuous motion throughout the exercise. 

This will help mobilize the nervous system with an emphasis on the femoral nerve. Do this continuous movement for 60 seconds for 4 sets daily. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing.

Anterior Hip & Thigh Pain: Femoral Nerve Glides

If you have a dull ache, tingling, loss of sensation in the front of the hip area or weakness into the knee, this exercise may help. Using a towel, lie on your belly with your forehead resting on your forearm. Hold on to the towel wrapped around your lower leg above your ankle. Have your low back in some extension at the start for the rest position. Then, flatten the low back by reversing the extension and flex the knee while pulling the towel to bring the heel closer to the butt and extend your neck backwards then release with continuous movement. This will help mobilize the nervous system with a bias on the femoral nerve. Do this continuous movement for 60 seconds for 4 sets daily. If you have any pain during the exercise or are unsure about what you are doing, consult your local Physiotherapist before continuing. 

Learn How to Properly Hip Hinge

The hip hinge is an important movement pattern that actively engages the posterior chain (glutes and hamstrings) and helps build the foundation for complex exercises such as the kettlebell swing, deadlift, and squat. A proper hip hinge requires the movement to begin at the hips with flexion of the hip muscles while the spine is kept at a neutral position for optimal power and strength. Depending on what exercise is being performed, the change in hip angle will vary. For instance, there will be more hip flexion and less knee flexion in a deadlift compared to a squat. Good pelvic mobility and control in the hip muscles is crucial in maintaining a neutral spine and preventing injury by minimizing the stress impact. Begin practising the hip hinge movement with the exercises below and continue with the following progressions once each stage has been mastered. 

Beginner Level:
1. Hip Rock: Begin by lying with your back and feet flat on the floor and both knees bent. Ensure the ribs are tucked in (towards the floor) and lift the hips towards the ceiling by engaging the core and glute muscles. Hold for 1-2 seconds, and then slowly bring the hips back to the starting position. Repeat 8-10

2. Glute Bridge: Begin in a “table-top” position with your hands flat on the floor directly below your shoulders and knees hip-width apart. While maintaining a neutral spine, slowly bring your hips back towards your heels while your hands and knees remain stationary in contact with the floor. Then, slowly bring your hips back to the starting position. Repeat 8-10 times. This exercise will help familiarize you with the basic movement pattern at the hip joint and ensuring the spine is kept neutral at all times.

Progression:
3. Hip Hinge with a Dowel: Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Hold a dowel vertically behind your back with one hand on the top end and the other end by the bottom end. The dowel should be in contact with the back of your head, mid-thoracic spine (center of your back), and sacrum (bottom of your back) throughout the movement. Keeping the knees and ankles stationary, slowly bring your hips back while you bring your shoulders and trunk forward. Then, slowly bring the hips back to the starting position. Repeat 8-10 times ensuring the dowel has a 3-point contact with your body at all times. Place a box in front by your knees to help fix the knees and feet in place.

4. Weighted Hinge (Wall): Stand a few inches away from the wall with your feet hip-width apart. Facing away from the wall, hold a light weight, such as a kettlebell or a dumbbell, by your chest and slowly bring your hips backwards until there is contact with the wall. Keep your knees and ankles stationary while your spine is kept at neutral throughout the movement. Slowly bring your hips back to the starting position and repeat 8-10 times.

Hip Hinge:
5. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and hold a dowel slightly more than shoulder-width apart (can also use a pair of dumbbells). Keep your knees and ankles stationary while maintaining a neutral spine. Bring your hips back while bringing the dowel down towards your knees. Ensure your chest is kept open and your shoulder blades are squeezed together to prevent rounding of the back. Do not sway the arms by keeping the dowel near your body during the movement. Then, bring your hips and the dowel back to starting position. Repeat 8-10 times. Remember to engage the core at all times.

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