Category Archives for "fitness"

Whole-Body Partner Workout

Looking to try something new for your next workout? Try these fun and challenging exercises with a partner at the gym or at home. 

1) Medicine Ball Pass: 

Lie on your back with a mat with your feet planted next to each others. Begin with one person holding the medicine ball, then both sit up by engaging the core, and pass the ball to the other person. Repeat back-and-forth passes by performing simultaneous sit-ups for 20 to 30 repetitions. 
                                                                                                                                  credit: Kami Price

2) Squat Seesaw:

Grab a resistance band with a handle on each end and stand face to face. Begin with one person performing a squat to bring the resistance band downwards, while the other person stands tall and brings the resistance band overhead by extending their arms. Remember to keep an upright body position through out the movement and engage the core. Repeat for 20 repetitions. 
                                                                                                                              credit: Travis McCoy

3) Push-up to Bent-over Row:

Partner #1 will begin in a push-up position by placing both hands on the floor shoulder-width apart while the partner #2 holds the ankles. Partner #1 will perform a push-up by engaging the core and glutes to lower their body towards the floor as Partner #2 holds their ankles by keeping their arms extended and back neutral. After Partner #1 has brought their body back up by pushing up, Partner #2 will then pull their partner’s ankles upwards to chest level to perform a row. Repeat 10 times before switching roles. 

                                                                                             credit: Kami Price

4) Single-Leg Core Rotation:

Stand tall side to side with your partner and hold a medicine ball. Raising the outer leg to a 90 degree angle for each person, engage the core, and rotate to pass the ball back and forth between your partner and yourself. Complete 10-15 passes before switching positions to raise the other leg and complete another set. 
                                                                                                                              credit: Travis McCoy

5) Plank High-Fives

Begin in a plank position facing each other by placing hands directly below your shoulders and body positioned in a straight line. Engage the core and keep the spine neutral, raise one hand while the other partner raises the opposite hand to high-five in the space between you and your partner. 

                                                                                                                            credit: Stephanie Smith
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5 Conditioning Exercises for Rock Climbing

Rock climbing is a fun, but challenging activity that requires strength, endurance, and skill. It is important to strengthen your arms and legs to move up near-vertical or overhanging rock. Having a strong core and torso will help keep the body balanced and up against the wall during the climb. Check out the following exercises below that to help condition your body before you tackle your next mountain or rock climbing wall.


EXERCISES:

1) Pull-ups 

These are an upper body, compound exercise that targets the biceps, latissimus dorsi, and upper back muscles. Use banded pull-ups if body-weight pull-ups are too difficult. Then progress to weighted pull-ups for 4 sets of 10 reps.

a. Hang from a pull-up bar and grasp the bar about shoulder-width apart with palms facing away from your face
b. Retract and adduct the scapula
c. Pull yourself up while bringing your elbows down to the floor until your chin passes the bar
d. Lower yourself all the way down, breathe, and repeat the pull-up

2) Staggered pushups

These engage your entire core as well as target your shoulder and chest muscles. Begin with regular pushups with hands side by side and slowly increase the difficulty by extending your one hand a few inches away from the other in various directions

a. Assume a prone position with your body straight, supported by your extended arms and your toes. Your hands should be outside of shoulder width but staggered, with one being higher than the other. This will be your starting position.
b. Initiate the movement by flexing the elbows, lowering your torso to the ground. Do not allow your hips to rise or to sag
c. Pause at the bottom of the motion, and then extend at the elbows to return to the starting position
d. At the completion of this set, reverse your hand position for the next round.

3) Finger hangs 

Can be performed on a door frame, rock rings, or pull-up bar simulate finger gripping on a rock climbing wall and helps to build hand and arm strength. Hang for five seconds, then rest for another five seconds. Repeat for a full minute. 


4) Weighted step ups 

These help condition your legs for power during a climb. Do 10 – 20 repetitions on each leg. Use a light to moderately heavy barbell or a dumbbell in each hand.


a. Stand facing a bench, step or plyometric box and place the ball of one foot up on the bench
b. Push up into full extension and then jump back to the floor, landing as softly as possible, returning to a squat position.

5) Cable rotations 

These target core strengthening and mobility that can help stabilize the body while moving the body in various positions across a rock wall.

a. Adjust the pulley handle to chest height. Step out and away from the weight. Feet are shoulder-width. Stand with a tight core and flat back. Push the handle out in front of you. Keep elbows slightly bent
b. Twist from the hips. Move arms across the body, achieving a full extension
c. Return to starting position
d. Once complete, do the same amount of sets/reps on the other side.

BONUS: Watch Claire (PT) from INSYNC PHYSIO demonstrate the “Ultimate Workout for Agility and Core” 
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

5 Effective Exercises for Tennis Elbow

What is Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)?

Tennis elbow is a widely common soft tissue condition characterized by pain and inflammation on the lateral and outer aspect of the elbow. It is typically due to overuse of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon through repetitive actions such as improperly playing tennis, operating machinery, typing or other gripping activities. Symptoms may include weakness in the arm, stiffness in the elbow, and difficulty performing common hand actions such as holding an object. While ice packs and braces can assist with pain control in the early stages of tennis elbow, improving one’s fitness is very important in the long-term management and prevention of this elbow condition. Try these five exercises to strengthen the arm:

BALL SQUEEZE (to improve grip strength)

1) Hold a tennis ball (rolled up sock or towel can also be used) in your hand.
2) Squeeze the ball for 5 seconds and then relax the hand for 10 seconds.
3) Repeat 8 – 12 times for 3 sets, then alternate to the other hand and repeat exercise.

WRIST TWISTS (to improve forearm supination)


1) Place your elbow on a table so that your hand and wrist are just off the edge.
2) Hold a very light dumbbell (around 2 lbs) in your hand.
3) Rotate the arm outward and turn the dumbbell up. Then rotate the arm inward so that the dumbbell will point back down.
4) Repeat 15-20 times for 3 sets on each arm.

WRIST FLEXION (to strengthen flexor muscles)

1) Place your elbow on a table so that your hand and wrist are just off the edge.
2) Hold a very light dumbbell (around 2 lbs) in your hand so that the palm is facing up.
3) Flex your wrist by curling the dumbbell towards the body and then back down to starting position.
4) Repeat 8 – 12 times for 3 sets. Alternate to other hand and repeat exercise.

WRIST EXTENSION (to strengthen extensor muscles)

1) Place your elbow on a table so that your hand and wrist are just off the edge.
2) Hold a very light dumbbell (around 2 lbs) in your hand so that the palm is facing down.
3) Let your wrist slowly drop down and then lift your wrist back up to starting position.
4) Repeat 8 – 12 times for 3 sets. Alternate to other hand and repeat exercise.

HAMMER CURLS (to condition your forearm muscles)


1) Stand with your feet shoulder width apart.
2) Hold a light dumbbell (5 to 10 lbs) in a hammer grip position (dumbbell is vertical) in both hands.
3) Keeping the elbows close to the body, flex your forearm upward to 90 degrees, then back down to starting position.
4) Repeat 8 – 12 times for 3 sets. Alternate to other arm and repeat exercise.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Step Up Your Beach Volleyball Game

Beach volleyball is an intense sport that requires good stamina and strength. Training various muscles of the body (core, lower body, upper body) to become stronger will allow you to hit harder and jump higher. Easily train on the sand using medicine balls, sand bags, kettle bells, or resistance bands with these specific exercises below.

CORE:

1)      Scissor kick: Lie down flat on your back with your arms extended straight out to the side, palms faced down. Raise one leg from the ground and then back down. Switch to the other leg. Do 16 reps for 3 sets with 1 minute rest in between each set. Variation: increase the difficulty of this move by placing a resistance band over your thigh area.
2)      Extended plank: start in a plank position withour elbows a few inches in front of your shoulders. Straighten your trunk and legs so that they are in line. Hold your abs tightly for 45 seconds to 1 minute. One set.


3)      Medicine ball slam: Hold a medicine ball with both hands and stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Lift the ball above your head, extending your whole body and slam the ball into the ground directly in front of you. Do 10 reps for 3 sets with 1 minute rest in between each set.

LOWER BODY:

1)      Squat jump twist: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart and squat down until your knees are at a 90 degree angle. Stand upwards and jump up in the air. Rotate 90 degrees as you jump up and land on both feet back to the starting position. Do 10 reps for 3 sets with 1 minute rest in between each set.

2)      Glute bridge walkout: Lie down flat on your back with your knees bent at a 90 degree angles and feet flat on the ground. Drive your hips up to end range, careful not to over flare your ribs. Slowly walk your feet out, one heel at a time and then return to the starting bridge position. Do 10 reps for 3 sets with 1 minute rest in between each set. Variation: increase the difficulty of this move by placing a resistance band over your thigh area.

UPPER BODY:


1)      Push press: Use a sandbag, medicine ball, or kettle bell and hold firmly with both hands in front of the chest. Push your sandbag or kettle bell straight up to the sky over your head. Do 10 reps for 3 set with 1 minute rest in between each set.

2)      Push ups: Starting in the plank position, place your palms onto the ground under your shoulders and lock out your elbows. Dig your toes into the ground and keep the feet close together. Slowly lower your body down until you are a few inches off the ground. Then push your body up to the starting position. Do 10 reps for 3 sets with 1 minute rest in between each set.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Squat Properly

Squats are an excellent way to target the full body and to build significant strength. It heavily relies on your thighs, calves, lower back, arms, and abs. Some key benefits include building muscle, burning fat, increasing endurance, and improving proprioception. However, proper form is needed to avoid back or knee pain.  
HOW TO SQUAT WITH A BARBELL:
Starting Position
1.      Stand with feet approximately shoulder-width apart, toes pointing straight ahead, and knees aligned over second and third toes.
         As much as 5-8° of external foot rotation is allowed in the starting position, some consider this normal anatomical position.
2.      To perform the high-bar back squat, rest the barbell on the shoulders, behind the neck, with hands grasping the bar wider than shoulder-width apart.

3.      To perform the low-bar back squat, rest the barbell on the middle trapezius region with hands grasping the bar wider than shoulder-width apart.
         It is important to note adequate shoulder mobility (external rotation) is required to hold the bar securely.
Movement Pattern
1.      Slowly begin to squat down by hinging at the hips and then flexing at the knees.  
2.      Allow glutes to “stick” out behind the body as if sitting into a chair.
3.      Keep the chest up and the cervical spine in a neutral position. Avoid excessive cervical flexion, extension, or anterior translation (jutting the head forward).
4.      Squat to a depth that can be safely controlled with no movement compensations.
         Common movement compensations include knee valgus (knock knees), rounding or arching of the low-back, an excessive forward lean of the torso, and overly externally rotating or pronating the feet.
5.      To rise back up, contract the gluteals and place pressure through the heels as the knees and hips are extended.
6.      Stand up straight until hips and legs are fully extended. Fully contract the gluteals in the standing position for maximal muscle recruitment.

FOR BEGINNERS:

1. Place the big ball up against the wall and have your lower back against the ball
2. Roll up a towel, place it between your knees and shimmy your feet out slightly in front of you.
3. Make sure your knee is in line with your second toe, squeeze the towel and keep your core engaged.
4. Squat down until your knees are at 90 degrees and hold that for 10 seconds.
5. Do 3 sets of 10. Rest for 5 seconds between each rep.

For reference:
http://www.ptonthenet.com/articles/biomechanics-of-the-squat-4016

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.