Category Archives for "body"

5 Morning Stretches to Wake Your Body Up

Ever feel sore from a workout that you did the previous day or from sleeping in an odd position all night? Try out these quick and simple stretches in bed when you wake up in the morning!

1) Full Body Stretch: 

Lie on your back with your legs together. Extend both of your arms overhead. Lengthen your spine by stretching your arms as far overhead and your legs stretched as far downwards as you can. Hold for 30 seconds or more.

2) Spinal Twist: 

Lie on your back with your right leg extended straight down. Bend the left leg at the knee and cross your knee to the other side of your body. Open your left arm to the side and turn your head to the left side. Hold for 30 seconds or more, then repeat on the other side.

3) Hamstring Stretch:

Lie on your back with one leg extended straight down. Hold the back of your thigh or your knee and bring the other leg extended upwards towards your chest. Bring the leg close to your chest until you feel a comfortable stretch through your hamstrings. Hold for 30 seconds or more, then repeat on the other side.

4) Child’s Pose:

Begin with your knees and feet together. Then sit back on your heels and extend both arms overhead placing your palms onto your bed. Take a deep breath in and press your belly against your thighs. Hold for 30 seconds or more. Variation: Walk your fingers over to the top right corner of your bed as far as you can reach to stretch the left side of your body. Then repeat on the other side.

5) Bedside Hip Lift: 

Begin by the side of your bed with both feet planted on the floor and your palms placed shoulder-width apart near the middle of the bed behind your body. Press your heels into the floor and your hands into the bed to lift your hips upwards towards the ceiling to form a straight line between the top of your head and to your knees. Hold for a couple of seconds, then slowly bring your hips back down to the starting position. Repeat 5 or 6 times.

Images retrieved from:
http://www.yogabasics.com/asana/child/
https://www.thoughtco.com/funny-good-morning-quotes-2831856
http://rajora.in/fitness/exercise-sequence/static-streching/
http://www.satyaliveyoga.com.au/2015/02/26/sleepasana/
http://sunina.com/2014/03/
https://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/advice/

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Squat Properly

Squats are an excellent way to target the full body and to build significant strength. It heavily relies on your thighs, calves, lower back, arms, and abs. Some key benefits include building muscle, burning fat, increasing endurance, and improving proprioception. However, proper form is needed to avoid back or knee pain.  
HOW TO SQUAT WITH A BARBELL:
Starting Position
1.      Stand with feet approximately shoulder-width apart, toes pointing straight ahead, and knees aligned over second and third toes.
         As much as 5-8° of external foot rotation is allowed in the starting position, some consider this normal anatomical position.
2.      To perform the high-bar back squat, rest the barbell on the shoulders, behind the neck, with hands grasping the bar wider than shoulder-width apart.

3.      To perform the low-bar back squat, rest the barbell on the middle trapezius region with hands grasping the bar wider than shoulder-width apart.
         It is important to note adequate shoulder mobility (external rotation) is required to hold the bar securely.
Movement Pattern
1.      Slowly begin to squat down by hinging at the hips and then flexing at the knees.  
2.      Allow glutes to “stick” out behind the body as if sitting into a chair.
3.      Keep the chest up and the cervical spine in a neutral position. Avoid excessive cervical flexion, extension, or anterior translation (jutting the head forward).
4.      Squat to a depth that can be safely controlled with no movement compensations.
         Common movement compensations include knee valgus (knock knees), rounding or arching of the low-back, an excessive forward lean of the torso, and overly externally rotating or pronating the feet.
5.      To rise back up, contract the gluteals and place pressure through the heels as the knees and hips are extended.
6.      Stand up straight until hips and legs are fully extended. Fully contract the gluteals in the standing position for maximal muscle recruitment.

FOR BEGINNERS:

1. Place the big ball up against the wall and have your lower back against the ball
2. Roll up a towel, place it between your knees and shimmy your feet out slightly in front of you.
3. Make sure your knee is in line with your second toe, squeeze the towel and keep your core engaged.
4. Squat down until your knees are at 90 degrees and hold that for 10 seconds.
5. Do 3 sets of 10. Rest for 5 seconds between each rep.

For reference:
http://www.ptonthenet.com/articles/biomechanics-of-the-squat-4016

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.