12 Tips for Faster Metabolism

Many people want to make big changes in the level of their metabolism. If your metabolism runs high you can burn fat and lose substantial weight with out a lot of extra activity or at least faster. The definition of metabolism is the level with which a persons body will make and then consume calories that are needed for life.

Lots of things will affect a persons level of metabolism and it can change at different times depending on the frequency one eats, his or her genetics, the volume of muscle mass, stress and activity. Things that make a persons metabolism slow down can be the loss of muscle mass because of the lack of activity. When that happens the body tends to consume its own muscle because there is a lack of energy from food to get along and finally the metabolism slows down because with advanced age physical activity normally declines.

1. A lean body mass will increase metabolism. It is certainly possible to delay the decline in metabolism as you grow older even though the decline is natural. Muscle volume is a determinant of metabolism that will take away fat or calories. There is no way around it that exercise is important. Weight training at least a couple of times a week will build muscle and strength and you can fill in the gaps between workouts with lighter easier exercises. Even things like taking the dog for walks and avoiding the elevator and taking the stairs can serve over time to help increase metabolism and in turn burn calories. An important factor is to match ones eating with ones activity. Some important suggestions for getting the right quality and quantity of exercise follow.

If your goal is strength training use these:

  • Add repetitions to a certain exercise (go from 5 reps to 10 reps).
  • Increase the amount of resistance (More weight, stronger bands, etc).
  • Seek out new proven exercise techniques when appropriate (new equipment can help).

To train for cardiovascular fitness:

  • Space the exercises with little breaks.
  • Combine different exercises and do a sort of cross training circuit.
  • Increase speed and resistance in the exercises.

2. Eat the first meal of the day, breakfast. Many people ignore that most important meal of the day using the excuse of time. It has been proven that those that eat breakfast will stay thinner than those who do not. The facts are that the metabolism can slow during the early hours if breakfast is delayed until midmorning or if it is skipped altogether.

3. Like an evil, avoid sugar. The reason is that sugar facilitates the ability of the body to store fat. The goal is to keep the blood-sugar as level as possible and eating foods high in sugar makes that nearly impossible. Also the fact that you are exercising several times a week will also help keep the sugar in the blood stabilized.

4. Hot Spicy foods increase metabolism, eat them.

5. Go to Sleep. People that do not get enough sleep are at risk to gain weight according to researchers. It has also been shown in some studies that the last few hours of sleep are when muscles are repaired and regenerated.

6. Drink more water. Because we are exercising we have toxins being released and they need to be flushed and water serves that propose. Conversely if there is not enough water the bodies functions are slowed down and all the systems decrease in speed and produce additional stresses and it becomes a spiraling problem.

7. Eat more small meals about 2-3 hours apart. Make it so you eat about 4 – 6 meals a day.

8. Do not skip meals. A dieter may want to skip meals but in order to lose weight the metabolism has to be kept high and in order for metabolism to be kept up there has to be fuel.

9. Get good at planned meals. Establish a balanced pattern and plan out the amounts and times to eat the proper meals. Avoid a sporadic schedule for meals as this is a huge mistake.

10. Get rid of the stress in your life. Stress can come from all different areas of your life and it can detrimentally affect your attempts to increase your metabolism. Work on the areas of stress and your metabolism will naturally increase.

11. Green tea in copious amounts as a alternate for drinking coffee, will serve to stimulate your metabolism and it does not have the negative side effects like coffee does if you drink too much.

12. Energy foods are a vital ingredient to making this change to increase your metabolism. Some energy foods are whole grains, beans, vegetables and fruits.

Before you embark on any health related change always consult your trusted health professional and listen to your body. To reach the goal of balancing and increasing ones metabolism and body weight is an obtainable goal but one needs patience and persistence as this is not a quick fix proposition. Do not allow anything except success as an option. You can reach your goal.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Use Acupressure for Back Pain

How to Apply Acupressure for Back Pain

First of all you need to “find” your spine in your foot. Sit on the floor with your legs crossed. Pick up any foot and loot at its inner edge. There is a line between the heel and big toe, which is a projection of the spine. Visually divide the line into several parts: the sacrum, lower back, chest and cervical spine. Now use your thumb to massage the line from the heel towards the toe. Do the massage with enough strength but within the rational scope. If there are problems in your spine, you will easily find their reflections in your foot during the massage. They will be felt as painful or sometimes hard points. While working with them you are actually working with your spine, but indirectly, since there is a close connection between them and the latter. What you do is the relaxation of the same nerve endings that make you keep tension in the back. The first relaxing effect will be observed right from the first massage session.
pressure points for back pain in foot

Feet Pressure Points For Back Pain Relief: How All This Works?

Does acupressure work for back pain? Yes, it does, and there is no mystery about it. Our soles and palms are the main organs of touch, and the 72, 000 nerve endings converge here (in yoga they are called 72,000 energy channels, or nadi). Palms and feet adequately assess the situation (temperature, wind, humidity, and more) and “report back” about it all the organs and systems of the body directly. Through this process, heat, and moisture regulating (and others) mechanisms are carried out without the intervention of our consciousness. But we can also use this to our advantage to reap the benefits: massage your feet – relax your body, place your feet into water – all your nervous system relaxes, put the feet into warm – all your body warms; and through acupressure you can relieve pain and ease the condition of all the organs and body systems.

How To Use Acupressure For Back Pain: More On Technique

Preparation. Wash your hands and feet with warm water, and pat dry with a towel. Heat the massage oil slightly.
The position of the body. Sit with your legs crossed. If you feel tension in the back, make a support for your back and buttocks. Put a cushion under the knee of the massaging leg, and grasp the foot.
Massage. At first, lubricate both feet with the heated oil. Then massage the feet one by one. Rub the soles from heel to toe and back. Twist and pull each toe. Press the foot from its edges for a few times. Then massage the reflex zones: use your thumb to press hard and rub the area in a circular motion. After the acupressure pat the soles. Take a relaxed foot with your hand and rotate it to work on joints: ankle, toes, and heel. Make sure the foot (and leg) does not strain; all the motions should be done with your hands only.
Massaging feet with the elbow. It is very convenient and requires much less effort than the massage with your fingers. You have to take the lotus or half lotus pose, and massage your feet with your elbow. You can increase the pressing force by pressing your palm with the other one.
The frequency and duration. The optimal way is to massage your feet for 5 minutes each daily or every other day. Then the effect will not take long to come.

Acupressure Contraindications

The contraindicated conditions are: infectious disease with fever; tumor or metastasis risk, varicose veins, swelling of the joints of the foot (You have to massage only the reflex zones, without touching the joints). You shouldn’t massage subcutaneous seals, fungal infections, warts and moles.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

What to Eat Before & After a Workout

Here are some great tips to try and foods to eat before and after a workout:
  • If you workout in the morning… You need to eat within 30 minutes of waking up so you can jump-start your metabolism. Try having a few bites of oatmeal or half a banana—having something is your system is better than nothing.
  • If you workout in the afternoon… Eat a light snack if you are hungry before your workout. Power foods like a small bowl of oatmeal, a banana, apple slices with peanut butter or muscle milk.
  • After your workout…
    Eat within 30 minutes after your workout so your body doesn’t start burning muscle. It’s important to fuel your body with some form of protein, so grab a handful or almonds or whip up a protein shake. Then, eat small meals every 3 hours throughout. Even If you’re not hungry, you should at least have a small snack. This will prevent you from waiting too long to eat and then overeating because you feel starving.
It is recommended to avoid foods that are high in fat and anything spicy before working out to avoid feeling sluggish and getting an upset stomach. It’s also extremely important to make sure you are hydrated before you hit the gym. Try to drink two to three cups of water a few hours before you workout and remember to bring your water bottle with you. Then hydrate throughout the day to replace all the H20 you lost while sweating it out.
No matter how you look at it, you should be eating and working out to feel healthy and good about yourself.
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

How to Prepare for your Golf Season

In all sports, preparation is the key to top performance. Baseball, hockey and even basketball have a preseason, which allows athletes an opportunity to gradually get in shape, so that they are “game ready” for the regular season. A preseason golf schedule can also give you a chance to work on your basic fundamentals as well time to set some goals for the upcoming season.

It is important to be in good physical shape before the season starts in order to maximize your performance on the course and help prevent injuries. If you have any physical issues in the preseason, we suggest that you first seek advice from your physician. Some injuries may require treatment from a physiotherapist or message therapist, simple stretching exercises or medications to help relieve pain.

If you have not maintained an active lifestyle over the winter, it is important to gradually work yourself into shape. There are three areas that I suggest you work on this spring to help improve your game. Flexibility training, aerobic training and strength training are all important components of a good golf swing.

First, work on stretching all your golf muscles and improving your overall flexibility. As our body ages we lose flexibility and our range of motion. The key muscles to work on include your core (abdominal) muscles, shoulders, back, hips and legs. All these muscles need to be stretched so that you can create a swing that can generate power and distance. Once your season begins it is important that you continue to stretch and warm up properly before you play and practice.

Aerobic training involves activities that will help you to improve blood flow and gradually increase your heart rate. A treadmill, stationary bike, short walks or even daily rides on your bicycle are a great way to start. It is important to start slowly and gradually increase the length of each of your training sessions. An average golfer that walks eighteen holes will walk close to four miles during their round. Prepare yourself properly this spring for that next “walk in the park.”

Strength training involves working your specific golf muscles to help generate power in your golf swing. Most players on tour understand and follow a regular program for strengthening their golf muscles. Work all your golf muscles and make sure that you equally work both sides of your body, when you work with weights.

Practice sessions at the range also need to be planned. Don’t be too eager to play golf before your swing and body is ready. At the range you can work on the various elements of your game and gain a better understanding of both your strengths and weaknesses. When you do play golf this spring, start with 9 holes and keep track of important statistics such as fairways hit, greens hit in regulation and putts per hole. These numbers will give you a great indication of what you need to work on. If you don’t understand how to improve your weaknesses, then take some lessons from a qualified instructor. You will be able to quickly pinpoint your swing flaws, make swing modifications and learn some effective drills that will help eliminate your swing mistakes.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Why Sitting is Bad for you

Sitting down for brief periods can help us recover from stress or recuperate from exercise. But nowadays, our lifestyles make us sit much more than we move around. Are our bodies built for such a sedentary existence? Murat Dalkilinç investigates the hidden risks of sitting down. 

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Preventing Overuse Injuries

Over the past 20 years more children are partici­pating in organized and recreational athletics. With so many young athletes playing sports, it’s no wonder injuries are common. Half of all sports medicine injuries in children and teens are from overuse. The following is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about overuse injuries and injury prevention tips.

What is an overuse injury?

An overuse injury is damage to a bone, muscle, ligament, or tendon due to repetitive stress without allowing time for the body to heal. Shin splints are an example of an overuse injury.
The following are the 4 stages of overuse injuries:
  1. Pain in the affected area after physical activity
  2. Pain during physical activity, not restricting performance
  3. Pain during physical activity, restricting performance
  4. Chronic, persistent pain even at rest

Who is at risk?

Children and teens are at increased risk for overuse injuries because growing bones are less resilient to stress. Also, young athletes may not know that certain symptoms are signs of overuse (for example, worsening shoulder pain in swimmers). If you think your child has an overuse injury, talk with your child’s doctor. A treatment plan may include making changes in how often and when the athlete plays, controlling pain, and physical therapy.

How to prevent overuse injuries

Athletes should stay away from excessive training programs that could be harmful. The following are guidelines to help prevent overuse injuries by promoting a healthy balance of activities.

Prepare

Athletes should have a preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE) to make sure they are ready to safely begin the sport. The best time for a PPE is about 4 to 6 weeks before the beginning of the season. Athletes also should see their doctors for regular health well­ child checkups.
Athletes should maintain a good fitness level during the season and off­season. Preseason training should allow time for general conditioning and sport­specific conditioning. Also important are proper warm­up and cool­down exercises.

Play smart

Athletes should avoid specializing in one sport before they reach puberty. Child “superstars” are often injured or burned out prior to college. Children should be encouraged to try a variety of sports.
Participation in a particular sport should be limited to 5 days per week.
Athletes should sign up for one team and one sport per season.

Rest up

Athletes should take at least 1 day off per week from organized activity to recover physically and mentally.
Athletes should take a combined 2 to 3 months off per year from a specific sport (may be divided throughout the year [that is, 1 out of every 6 months off ]).

Training

Increases in weekly training time, mileage, or repetitions should be no more than 10% per week. For example, if running 10 miles this week, increase to 11 miles the next week.
Cross­train. Athletes should vary their endurance workouts to include multiple different activities like swimming, biking,  or elliptical trainers.
Perform sport­specific drills in different ways. For example, running in a swimming pool instead of only running on the road.

How to prevent burnout

Burnout (overtraining syndrome) includes mental, physical, and hormonal changes that can affect performance. To help prevent burnout in your child, follow the guidelines in this handout. Other suggestions include
Keep your child’s practice fun and age­appropriate.
Focus on your child’s overall wellness, and teach them how to listen for problems with their bodies.

Remember

Parents: Your goal should be to promote a well­rounded athlete who can enjoy regular physical activity for a lifetime.
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Medicine Ball Buster Workout

Medicine balls are a fun alternative to weights for both resistance training and cardio. They generally range from 2 to 12 pounds and can be used to tone your upper body, lower body and core. They can also help improve range of motion, coordination, and flexibility. Try these moves for a killer “ball busting” workout: This killer medicine ball workout mixes cardio and resistance moves to help you build strength and blast fat—all while sculpting a tighter torso and flatter abs. A weighted ball is a great training tool because you can add it to almost any exercise to challenge your core stability and improve coordination. For best results, do this workout on two or three nonconsecutive days per week.

Workout details: Do each move as quickly as you can with good form, moving from one exercise to the next with little or no rest in between. Once you’ve finished the last move, rest and repeat the entire circuit 1 or 2 more times.

Power Cross Chop: Stand with your feet wider than hip-width apart, holding the medicine ball at your chest. Brace your abs in tight and twist your torso to the left. Allow your right heel to pivot off the floor and bring the ball up over your left shoulder. Quickly “chop” the ball down and across your right thigh, lunging as you pivot your left heel off the floor. That’s one rep. Do 15 reps in a row and then switch sides and repeat.

Figure 8 Scoop: Hold the medicine ball at your chest and stand with your feet wide. Step your left leg out into aside lunge as you scoop the ball down and to the outside of your left thigh. Press through your right heel to straighten your right as you reach the ball up and overhead, quickly reversing the lunge and scoop to the right. (Think of tracing a figure-8 pattern with the ball as you lunge from side to side). That’s one rep. Do 15 reps total.

Split Push-Up with Knee Tuck: Get into a push up position with your feet wider than hip-width apart. Place your right hand on top of the medicine ball (if this is too tough, modify on your knees). Balancing on the ball, lower your body into a pushup. As you extend your arms, bend your left knee across your chest towards the ball. Quickly step your left foot back to the floor and repeat. Work up to 15 reps on both sides. To make this move even more challenging, bring your feet closer together in your pushup position.

Balancing Burpee: Standing with your feet hip-width apart, hold the ball at your chest. Squat down and place the ball on the floor, keeping your arms extended. Shift your weight into the ball, pressing your hands on top. Quickly jump your feet back into full plank position, still balancing on top of the ball. Brace your abs in tight to help your balance. Jump your feet back in, landing in a squat. Quickly stand up and press the ball overhead. That’s one rep. Try for 15 reps in a row. Too tough? Try walking your feet in and out of your squat and plank position instead. Too easy? Add a jump when you stand and press the ball overhead.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

5 Common Running Injuries and How to Prevent Them

While running is a great workout, the risk for running-related injuries increases as people seek that finish line. Taking care of one’s shins, knees, hips and back is critical to a runner’s overall health. Wearing supportive running shoes and taking a workout onto forgiving surfaces are tried-and-true practices for runners to reduce shock on the legs and body. Read on for the basics of the five most common running injuries.
1. Shin splints. One of the most common injuries among runners is shin splints, a term given to any pain experienced at the front of the lower leg. Shin splints occur at the front inside of the shin bone and are caused by long-distance, high-impact running, inadequate footwear, an increase of training too quickly or running on hard surfaces—or a combination of all of these. However, it can be tough to gauge the severity of shin splints. The pain usually fades over the course of the exercise session or run, but it will most likely return after the activity and may even be worse.
How to Prevent Shin Splits
  • Before and after running, stretch the calf muscle and Achilles tendon to target the muscles of the lower leg.
  • Engage the muscles of the back of the legs rather than place all of the impact on the shin and front-leg muscles.
  • Don’t overstride. Keep your stride longer in back and shorter in front.
  • Engage in strength-training exercises for the calf muscles.
  • Warm up before increasing speed during a run.
2. Runner’s knee. Runner’s knee results from the overuse of the knee and is commonly developed in novice runners as well as women. “To ensure muscles are not overworked, long-distance runners should make it a rule not to increase their distances more than 10 percent per week. One sign of runner’s knee is pain on the outside of the knee, which can become aggravated by running, especially downhill. Other symptoms are tender trigger points in the gluteal area, as well as tightness and pain during flexion or extension of the knee.
How to Prevent Runner’s Knee
  • Avoid aggressive runs, especially downhill.
  • Strengthen the quadriceps muscle, as a weak quad is a common cause of the ailment.
  • Because runner’s knee can be caused by tight hamstrings and calf muscles, be sure to stretch both of these muscles before and after running.
  • Use insoles or heel pads during your run to reduce impact.
3. Snapping hip. Snapping hip is a condition that results in an audible snapping or popping feeling around the hip joint when the hip is flexed and extended. This sensation can either be felt externally or internally. Athletes are at special risk for developing this syndrome as a result of the repetitive and physically demanding movements they do. With runners, snapping hip is attributed to extreme thickening of the tendons in the hip region. Pain can be reduced through rest and inactivity, but symptoms can last for an extended period of time, causing it to eventually become very painful.
How to Prevent Snapping Hip
  • Avoid running for an extended period of time to alleviate pain and prevent recurrence.
  • Maintain good flexibility and strength by lightly stretching the muscles around the thigh, hip and pelvis.
  • Before engaging in running again, have a specialist assess your running technique to determine if that is causing the ailment.
4. Neck pain. Stress tends to accumulate in the neck area, and neck ailments in runners are common. As the neck balances a 10-pound head and compensates for deficiencies in imbalances in the arches of the feet or the curves of the back, the neck takes on a lot of physical burden, and for runners, sometimes the ailment is coupled with poor running form or tense muscles during the run.
How to Prevent Neck Pain
  • Take breaks when standing or sitting for a long period of time.
  • Adjust your desk, chair and computer so that your computer monitor is at eye-level, your knees rest at a point slightly lower than hips, and you have chair armrests available for additional support.
  • Slowly introduce yoga postures for neck and back pain to strengthen muscles.
  • Concentrate on standing with correct posture. Keep your head centered over your spine, so gravity works with your neck rather than against it.
5. Lower-back pain. Runners who already have lower-back problems may find that their ailments are worsened by the impact running places on their body.  In some cases, lower-back pain can lead to sciatica, herniated disc or degenerative disc disease. Lower-back pain can develop after running too far a distance before properly warming up and can be experienced in muscular strains, spasms and pains.
How to Prevent Lower-Back Pain
  • Prior to a run, be sure to perform a thorough warm-up.
  • Engage in gentle daily stretching that alleviates tight back muscles and loosens tight hamstrings.
  • Do strength-training routines to condition and tone the core muscles of the back.
  • Adjust your chair so that the positioning doesn’t strain the lower back.
InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Bad Knees? Stay Away from These Exercises

Bad knees may seem like a legitimate excuse to dodge the gym, and when you partake in high-impact activities, we can see why exercising might lose its allure! One of the best treatments for knee pain, however, is actually fitness! Exercise can be a potent medicine for bad knees, as long as you use the correct form and technique. Building up muscle around your joints can protect you from further injury by alleviating extra stress on your knees! So instead of skipping out on a workout altogether, try avoiding these high-impact exercises and work on maintaining good posture!

Lunges: Not all lunge variations are bad for the knees, but we tend to overextend our legs over our toes during lunges. That puts a lot of pressure on the kneecap, which can cause some serious damage over time!

Burpees: Don’t get too excited! Burpees themselves have the potential to be the perfect exercise for a tight, toned body. However, good form is absolutely essential in order to avoid injury. The more we do, the more lazy we get, and that is when we start running into knee problems! If you find yourself getting tired, try jump-free burpees instead!

Deep squats: Just like with lunges, we often allow our knees to go past our toes when we squat. This can cause extreme wear and tear on those joints, so if you are going to do do squats, make sure your posture is pristine!

Running: Running is a very high-impact form of exercise, so if your knees aren’t as strong as they used to be you may be better off giving up on your dreams of running a marathon. Try out a lower-impact workout like swimming or using the elliptical.

Hurdle stretches: While we always encourage stretching before and after working out, some stretches (including this one!) can really take their toll on bad knees! The hurdle stretch in particular, which requires you to sit with one leg tucked back by your bottom, can put a lot of unnecessary stress on your joints.

Seated Knee Extensions: This machine can cause you to fully extend your knees, and if you are accustomed to churning out several reps at a high weight, those toned quads may be more trouble than they are worth! You will put a lot of stress on the cartilage and the joint of the knee. Looking to tone those legs?

Jumping: Like running, jumping tends to be a high-impact exercise that can put a lot of pressure on our joints. Plyometrics can be incredibly effective if you are looking to whip yourself into shape, but often leads to the application of more than 2 to 3 times your body weight on your joints. Try a spinning class instead for a low-impact workout that is sure to crush those calories!

Kickboxing: Kickboxing can be a blast, but any exercise that requires sudden, directional changes can have a negative impact on weak knees. It’s easy to overextend your legs during high kicks, so make sure you are concentrating on your posture as well as your power!

Remember, you’ve only got the one body so be sure to treat it well! Simple modifications or variations on these exercises can go a long way in reducing any unnecessary stress on the joints. Fitness is essential to leading a healthy lifestyle, so don’t be discouraged by weakening knees! There are many ways to freshen up your fitness goals to suit your lifestyle.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.

Benefits of Acupuncture for Sports Injury

Which Athletes Benefit From Acupuncture? 

Acupuncture can be beneficial for those practicing bodybuilding and for any other athletes who are training in competitive sports, aerobics, martial arts, outdoor training, or any strenuous activity as it enhances performance and gives the athlete a competitive edge. Competition is not just about physical strength or endurance; it is also about psychological confidence, which can significantly affect performance skills. Acupuncture can enhance the ability to stay focused, lower anxiety, and jump psychological obstacles which stand in their way. 

Benefits of Acupuncture There are many benefits provided by acupuncture that can help an athlete that participates in any sport:

1. Acupuncture Helps The Body To Heal Itself From Injury While Reducing Pain At The Same Time: For anyone who is physically active, an injury may occur, either acutely or chronically, over time. Statistics show that adults suffer more than one million sports-related traumas annually. Injuries may include fractures, muscle strains, strained ligaments, tendons or joints, shin splints along a variety of other strains. Typically, the back, shoulders, elbows, knees, and feet are most affected during a sports related injury. Arthritis is a chronic condition which can be a result of a sports-related injury, manifesting over a long-period of time.

While massage therapy relaxes muscles and tendons, acupuncture supports and reinforces the whole body to heal itself. Acupuncture reduces the pain and speeds healing in addition to strengthening the body by reducing swelling or spasms, improving blood circulation, and stimulating natural endorphins and anti-inflammatory hormones in the body.

2. Acupuncture Enhances Performance By Cleansing The Body Organs: Acupuncture can also cleanse the body organs, which may hold unnecessary toxins, tension and stress. Qi, live-giving energy that flows to every cell, tissue, muscle, and organ in your body through 14 main meridian pathways, can become stagnated. Acupuncture can attract or repel this energy, re-establishing a balanced flow of energy throughout the whole body.

Conclusion
It is clear that acupuncture can improve performance, boost confidence, cleanse the body of toxins, and provide support during times of injury. So, as you head out to the gym or prepare for that marathon, drink lots of water, stretch, and consider acupuncture as part of your health regimen.

InSync Physiotherapy is a multi-award winning health clinic helping you in Sports Injuries, Physiotherapy, Exercise Rehabilitation, Massage Therapy, Acupuncture & IMS.